Who Bombed Judi Bari? Image
Metascore
59

Mixed or average reviews - based on 6 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: A news anchor reports while graphic news coverage of a terrorist car bomb attack in 1990 in Oakland, CA is shown. Two Earth First! activists are immediately blamed by the FBI for bombing themselves. We learn that the victim/suspects Judi Bari and Darryl Cherney have later sued the FBI and Oakland Police and that Judi Bari is now dying of cancer before her case goes to trial. Weak though defiant, she gives her deposition, on camera, just a month before she dies. [Hokey Pokey] Expand
  • Director: Mary Liz Thomson
  • Genre(s): Biography, Crime, Documentary, News
  • Rating: Not Rated
  • Runtime: 95 min
  • More Details and Credits »
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Reviewed by: Ronnie Scheib
    Nov 18, 2012
    70
    The film, produced by Cherney, makes a clear and cogent case (later upheld by a court verdict) that police and FBI falsified evidence in order to discredit Bari's cause.
  2. Reviewed by: Michelle Orange
    Nov 13, 2012
    70
    Insult upon injury didn't stop the central figure of Mary Liz Thomson's tough and intriguingly well-told account of the fight between environmentalists and corporate raiders (perhaps abetted, we learn, by the government) from taking the battle to her deathbed.
  3. Reviewed by: Frank Scheck
    Nov 18, 2012
    70
    The only film ever to be released with the promise of a reward--$50,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the bomber--Who Bombed Judi Bari? is an engrossing account of the case.
  4. Reviewed by: Elizabeth Weitzman
    Nov 15, 2012
    60
    There is no satisfactory answer to the titular question posed by this no-frills environmental documentary. But first-time feature director Mary Liz Thomson does answer another one at least as important, by showing us who Judi Bari was.
  5. Reviewed by: Sheri Linden
    Dec 7, 2012
    60
    Though its early sections feel repetitive and self-congratulatory, the documentary's tension builds in the way director Mary Liz Thomson uses archival material, much of it from TV news.
  6. Reviewed by: Neil Genzlinger
    Nov 16, 2012
    50
    Relies too much on rehash and preaching to the choir to kindle a broad-based outrage, but it does make you wonder what really happened on May 24, 1990.