User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 100 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 93 out of 100
  2. Negative: 5 out of 100

Review this movie

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Jul 25, 2011
    9
    Movie Being Reviewed: 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?' Dan, your draft review appears below as it will be displayed on the Facets site. To amend your review, choose Make Changes. Once you are happy with your review, press Confirm to submit it. Currently 5/5 Stars.   | Dan#17 I remember seeing this movie many times during it's summer 1988 theatrical release. I was much impressed and agreed it was deserving of it's critical rave reviews. Rarely does a film present such a sophisticated mix of style, technique, imagination and originality. The concept was simple: combine live action with animation, which was already done before, not so convincingly. Here's a case where the sum truly is greater than it's parts. A rather ordinary live action film is combined with traditional cell animation, in ways that were never seen before in cinema. These many individual techniques already existed, however no one took the time or trouble to put them all together before this film. Besides the realism of the live action and animated world interacting with each other, this film represented another historic first. It was the first time well known classic cartoon characters such as from Disney, Warner Brothers and other studios ever appeared together in a film. This was to be the last time Mel Blanc supplied the voices for so many famous and beloved Warner Brothers cartoon characters, such as Bugs Bunny. This is truly an inspired film in many ways. Unique, highly entertaining, influential and amazing, for children and adults of all ages. Masterfully done. Expand
  2. Oct 15, 2011
    10
    I see no reason not to like this film, it's uproariously funny, with plenty of memorable scenes and quotes to keep you going for ages. Each and every character are suited to their roles, perfectly picked, as a film, you have to have a particular set of actors and actresses to play certain people, or voice cartoon people and animals, otherwise your film will dramatically flop at the box office. You can see here that the production crew did not fail to call on the best of the people in order to create the classic movie of all sorts.
    Unlike many more modern films where a hybrid of live-action and animation is created, Who Framed Roger Rabbit is one of the best types of these films where the interactions between the live people and the cartoons and accuracy of positioning cartoons in the right place are realistic, and you can actually see relationships developing between real life people and cartoons. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is certainly fine art, in particularly the finest, as well as being funny, there is always a darkness beneath, in the form of Judge Doom, which is played with amazing precision by Christopher Lloyd. It does so without ruining the atmosphere, as some films always fail to combine darkness and laughter in the certain amount of time.
    This film is for everyone - who says its for kids only? Of course there are innuendos and threats which goes over kids heads, but it has a certain something which makes it for everyone. I was 16 when I first watched it, and I loved it.
    Expand
  3. Jul 22, 2011
    10
    This is one of the best movies that combine both animation and real life. It's spectacular how realistic the interactions between them are, because it draws attention away from the fact that the cartoons are just ink, pen and pencil and aren't actually there. Normally I felt upset that the woman who voiced Jessica Rabbit was left uncredited, but she still did a brilliant job; and the whole cast did the same of keeping up the pace of the movie. I'm certain the voices of especially Eddie Valiant, Roger Rabbit and Judge Doom couldn't have gone to anyone else because I couldn't help but experience the emotions (especially of laughter but also amazingly merges fear and chills down the back of your spine; mostly when Judge Doom was on the screen) that you're supposed to experience in this sort of movie. And Gilbert's right, this movie is FUN. Especially the mystery you get to unravel along the way. Expand
  4. Jul 18, 2013
    10
    Hilarious stuff done over the top in major style. Had me surprised for how sexual it was with all the Jessica Rabbit stuff. But all in all, it was a creative and hilarious movie.
  5. Jun 17, 2014
    10
    I love the film it amazing colors it amazing cast its amazing crossover with cartoon cast it's one of the best flims ever made in fact go see the stooge in 2016 4 a surpise
  6. Oct 6, 2010
    10
    Who can't love tis movie. It's funny and very entertaining. I saw this movie when I was little and I still like it today. This movie does have some adult themes but not so much that kids can't see it.
  7. Nov 24, 2010
    10
    I think I might request in for christmas. The last time I saw this was years ago but I have fond mems of it soo My Videos & Playlists Favourites My Channel Video Editor Subscriptions Insight Messages Account Settings Messages Compose Inbox Personal Messages Shared with You Comments Friend Invites Video Responses Sent Address Book » 1-2 Inbox Delete From Subject Date

    ThatShowAbout
    :P
    24 Nov 2010

    termo543
    Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Private.
    24 Nov 2010 1-2 Help About Safety Privacy Terms Copyright Uploaders & Partners Developers Advertising
    Report a bug Language: English Location: UK Safety mode: Off
    Expand
  8. Nov 13, 2011
    10
    Who Framed Roger Rabbit perfected the combination of animation and live-action together into a full length feature film that was amazing for its time and still amazing today. Talents like Bob Hopkins (Eddie Valiant) and Christopher Lloyd (Judge Doom) talking to animated characters on the screen (or nothing/ manikins on set while the film was in production) were performed fantastically that became believable to the viewer's eye. The film contains a variety of comedy, action and drama all presented well with such memorable and iconic characters for all audiences to enjoy. The film may have some innuendos and content that are not suitable for the younger ones, but the movie does hide those really well for the children to not catch on. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is an inspiring film for animators and filmmakers alike and shows that cartoons aren't just around this world to entertain children only. For someone who watched this movie countless of times, Who Framed Roger Rabbit receives a perfect 10 from me. Expand
  9. Apr 16, 2013
    9
    This movie has got to be one of my favorite movies of my childhood. A true classic. The crossover that almost everyone wanted to see. While time has been a little hard on the movie, it still think it is highly entertaining. There is nothing much I can say about this movie that the Nostalgia Critic didn't say in his review. This movie manages to bring two big studios together and still retain their individuality within the movie all at the same time being completely loyal to their characters.

    Overall:
    Who Framed Roger Rabbit will always be a timeless classic for me and one of my favorite movies.
    Expand
  10. Sep 6, 2013
    10
    Director Robert Zemeckis has created an extraordinary world of wizardry and magic by combining animation and live-action that' ll make your mind blown into pieces.
Metascore
83

Universal acclaim - based on 15 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 15
  2. Negative: 1 out of 15
  1. Combines live-action and animation with breathtaking wizardry... Alternately hilarious, frightening, and awesome.
  2. Without warning, the picture falls hard into the very trap it had so studiously avoided, the one marked Expensive Gimmick... The same feature that begins like no film you've ever seen ends like every cartoon you've always avoided.
  3. Reviewed by: Richard Corliss
    50
    Something got lost in the move from storyboard to screen, and in the stretch from seven minutes to 103. [27 June 1988]