Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 16
  2. Negative: 0 out of 16
  1. Reviewed by: Peter Labuza
    Jun 6, 2013
    91
    A testament to [Resnais'] positive outlook on not only the possibility of cinema, but the possibilities of life.
  2. Reviewed by:  Ignatiy Vishnevetsky
    Jun 5, 2013
    91
    Resnais’ new film, You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet, is ostensibly an adaptation of two unrelated plays by Jean Anouilh: "Eurydice" (1941) and "Dear Antoine": Or, "The Love That Failed" (1971). However, Resnais’ methods of adaptation — placing one play within the other, and then refracting its dialogue across multiple characters and layers of reality — quickly eclipse the source material.
  3. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Jun 6, 2013
    90
    You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet is a sly, elegant meditation on the relationship between reality and artifice. But it is a thought-experiment driven above all by emotion.
  4. Reviewed by: Farran Smith Nehme
    Jun 6, 2013
    88
    There is something both mischievous and moving about a world-famous director who, closing on his 10th decade, designs a movie that celebrates his actors: their varying ages, their versatility, their heart.
  5. Reviewed by: Gary Goldstein
    Jul 4, 2013
    80
    A crafty, brainy and uniquely stirring concoction.
  6. Reviewed by: Eric Hynes
    Jun 4, 2013
    80
    What elevates the film is a pervasive, palpable sense of loss — between lover and beloved, young and old, stage and screen.
  7. Reviewed by: Geoff Andrew
    Jun 2, 2013
    80
    The film is touching, but more than that it’s wise, witty and thought-provoking.
  8. Reviewed by: Eric Kohn
    Jun 2, 2013
    75
    The cumulative effect is occasionally dizzying but transparent, a frantic attempt to cram themes into cinematic conceit.
  9. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    Jun 7, 2013
    70
    The result is complex yet lighthearted, as diverting as it is meditative. Resnais uses contrapuntal editing — one of his trademarks — as well as artificial settings, special effects, split screens, cinematic references and anachronistic devices to keep viewers tipsily off-balance.
  10. Reviewed by: Calum Marsh
    Jun 4, 2013
    70
    Perhaps the richest of Resnais's recent efforts.
  11. Reviewed by: Stan Hall
    Jun 2, 2013
    67
    For those with adventurous tastes and a little extra patience, the 90-year-old's possible swan song (though he evidently is far from fatigued) is rewarding.
  12. Reviewed by: Andrew Schenker
    Jun 2, 2013
    63
    The film works best when it focuses viewer attention most acutely on the story, deflecting it away from the director's manipulations.
  13. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Jun 2, 2013
    60
    This reflection on the past, love and death through the prism of layers of theatrical endeavor is both serious and frisky, engaging on a refined level but frustratingly limited in its complexity and depth.
  14. Reviewed by: Peter Debruge
    Jun 2, 2013
    50
    Though Resnais’ gamble seems to have failed, it’s encouraging to see a director on the brink of 90 still willing to experiment in a way most helmers half his age wouldn’t dare.
  15. Reviewed by: Robbie Collin
    Jun 2, 2013
    40
    While his ambitious conceit hangs together over two hours of loudly-declaimed meta-metatheatricality, my word, does it feel like an unholy slog.
  16. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Jun 2, 2013
    40
    Despite its moments of charm and caprice, the film is prolix, inert, indulgent and often just plain dull.

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