You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet Image
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69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh,You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet opens with a who's-who of French acting royalty (including Mathieu Amalric, Michel Piccoli and frequent Resnais muse Sabine Azema) being summoned to the reading of a late playwright's last will and testament. There,Based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh,You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet opens with a who's-who of French acting royalty (including Mathieu Amalric, Michel Piccoli and frequent Resnais muse Sabine Azema) being summoned to the reading of a late playwright's last will and testament. There, the playwright (Denis Podalydes) appears on a TV screen from beyond the grave and asks his erstwhile collaborators to evaluate a recording of an experimental theater company performing his Eurydice--a play they themselves all appeared in over the years. But as the video unspools, instead of watching passively, these seasoned thespians begin acting out the text alongside their youthful avatars, looking back into the past rather like mythic Orpheus himself. Gorgeously shot by cinematographer Eric Gautier on stylized sets that recall the French poetic realism of the 1930s, You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet is an alternately wry and wistful valentine to actors and the art of performance from a director long fascinated by the intersection of life, theater and cinema. [Kino Lorber] Collapse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 16
  2. Negative: 0 out of 16
  1. Reviewed by: Peter Labuza
    Jun 6, 2013
    91
    A testament to [Resnais'] positive outlook on not only the possibility of cinema, but the possibilities of life.
  2. Reviewed by: A.O. Scott
    Jun 6, 2013
    90
    You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet is a sly, elegant meditation on the relationship between reality and artifice. But it is a thought-experiment driven above all by emotion.
  3. Reviewed by: Gary Goldstein
    Jul 4, 2013
    80
    A crafty, brainy and uniquely stirring concoction.
  4. Reviewed by: Mark Jenkins
    Jun 7, 2013
    70
    The result is complex yet lighthearted, as diverting as it is meditative. Resnais uses contrapuntal editing — one of his trademarks — as well as artificial settings, special effects, split screens, cinematic references and anachronistic devices to keep viewers tipsily off-balance.
  5. Reviewed by: Stan Hall
    Jun 2, 2013
    67
    For those with adventurous tastes and a little extra patience, the 90-year-old's possible swan song (though he evidently is far from fatigued) is rewarding.
  6. Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Jun 2, 2013
    60
    This reflection on the past, love and death through the prism of layers of theatrical endeavor is both serious and frisky, engaging on a refined level but frustratingly limited in its complexity and depth.
  7. Reviewed by: Peter Bradshaw
    Jun 2, 2013
    40
    Despite its moments of charm and caprice, the film is prolix, inert, indulgent and often just plain dull.

See all 16 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of
  2. Mixed: 0 out of
  3. Negative: 0 out of