13

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13 Image
Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 32 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 86 Ratings

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  • Artist(s): Ozzy Osbourne, Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler
  • Summary: The first release since 1978's Never Say Die! with Ozzy Osbourne was produced by Rick Rubin and includes former Rage Against the Machine drummer Brad Wilk taking over for Bill Ward.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 32
  2. Negative: 0 out of 32
  1. Kerrang!
    Jun 20, 2013
    100
    In its eight track, Ozzy, Tony, and bassist Geezer Butler have managed to once again capture that special essence which makes them so magical. And it's bloody fantastic. [1 Jun 2013, p.52]
  2. 80
    In expressing all of these [themes] without tumbling into absurdity, it helps to have a klaxon whine like Ozzy's delivering them, while Tony Iommi cranks out those trademark slow, molten-lead riffs that trundle through 13 like tank tracks.
  3. Jun 27, 2013
    80
    Rubin’s experiment has paid off handsomely, even though at times you’ll find yourself comparing the new songs to any number of familiar signature tunes from Sabbath’s catalogue.
  4. Uncut
    Jun 6, 2013
    70
    Of course, Black Sabbath can't fully turn the clock back to the beginning--but they can still do a pretty good job of sounding like the beginning of the end. [Jul 2013, p.70]
  5. 67
    The result is surprisingly adventurous, considering the monochrome palette of Osbourne's latter-day solo work.... Still, Rubin makes too much here feel dry and disappointingly small.
  6. Jun 13, 2013
    60
    It is a bit Sabbath-by-numbers, but given the weight of history (it's their first studio album together in 35 years), you can see why they would kind of back into the thing.
  7. Jun 14, 2013
    40
    13 certainly isn’t the all-blunts-blazing return Sabbath pledged, and with songwriting that imitates rather than evokes the past, all the goodwill in the world doesn’t change the fact that Sabbath has failed to deliver on its promise.

See all 32 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19
  1. Jun 11, 2013
    10
    I have prayed to God for almost a decade I am 20 that Ozzy would reunite with Sabbath and create one last masterpiece album. Thank you GodI have prayed to God for almost a decade I am 20 that Ozzy would reunite with Sabbath and create one last masterpiece album. Thank you God and Black Sabbath for now my dream has come true. The album closes with a similar rain that started of the first album, my life is now complete :)
    This will be the last Sabbath album to be created with the real front-man Sir Osbourne, so I hope fans do not ignore it and actually go and purchase it to show that love for real rock music still exists.
    My last point is that Bill Ward not being on the album is a shame but not a reason to not love the album, if he did not want to accept the terms presented to him then he should be looked down on not the rest of the band, and Wilks plays very well on 13 so no complaints only praise from me. The album deserves a 9 but I give it a ten to balance out the 1's many angry pro bill ward fan-boys will put under the rating, please do not do that for it is very unfair and childish... may the true metal gods live forever in our souls!
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  2. Jun 23, 2013
    10
    This album is a grower. If you never cared for 1970-75 era Sabbath, then move along. But if you did... well, this is what we've all beenThis album is a grower. If you never cared for 1970-75 era Sabbath, then move along. But if you did... well, this is what we've all been waiting for. The urgency and heaviness from the best moments of original Sabbath yup. Multi-part songs with minimal repetition and endless new riffs yup. New, spare, clear production yup. The compression of sound is something to get used to, just as the muddiness or "dry" sounds of Master of Reality and Vol. 4 respectively were unique to those records. Ozzy stays in his lower register to good effect. The lyrics, brilliantly, remain on the line between profound and hilarious, just as they always did. Tony and Geezer just rock on this album. The best any of these guys have managed since Sabotage this is now a ninth classic, to add to the first six with Ozzy and the first two with Dio. Expand
  3. kik
    Oct 15, 2013
    9
    Like many I have waited many years for this album (since 79) and I'm not disappointed. If I were to have any gripe it would be with theLike many I have waited many years for this album (since 79) and I'm not disappointed. If I were to have any gripe it would be with the mixing, it leaves little room to groove, metal is consuming enough without compressing it and oversampling it to the point where cranking it WAY up hurts. Apart from the aforementioned this album blends almost seamlessly with the old Oz albums, Ozzy sounds more like his solo self rather then the Ozzy of 'Never Say Die', but with rumors already circulating about another album I hope his drone he developed pretty much since No More Tears will vanish, either way I'm happy these guys reformed, i saw them live in Melbourne and apart from my kids being born was the single best night of my life. Long live these true legends.

    Bill Ward, please get in shape for the next album or tour, I'm sure I speak for all when I say we miss you.

    Terry Halmshaw Burrumbeet Australia.
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  4. Jan 15, 2014
    8
    Welcome back to Black Sabbath. This "13" is a step into their 70s earlier work. Nothing new, but it can be considered a good effort. I thinkWelcome back to Black Sabbath. This "13" is a step into their 70s earlier work. Nothing new, but it can be considered a good effort. I think it definitely closes the circle of their studio career. Expand
  5. May 10, 2016
    8
    This is a real treat for fans of early 70s Black Sabbath. Brad Wilk does a serviceable job filling in for Bill Ward, even though his style isThis is a real treat for fans of early 70s Black Sabbath. Brad Wilk does a serviceable job filling in for Bill Ward, even though his style is more in the vein of traditional rock than jazz, but if anything it helps to modernize and rejuvenate the band's classic sound.

    My only real complaint is that maybe it focuses a bit too much on the "doom and gloom" side of the band, even though they were more diverse than that. The album is lacking in anything akin to the instrumentals "Fluff" or "Laguna Sunrise" although they come sort of close with "Zeitgeist" which is inspired by "Planet Caravan". All in all though, it's a fantastic comeback effort and all musicians involved are on top form.
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  6. Sep 14, 2013
    7
    Decided not to buy after hearing some songs on the radio. It is definitely Black Sabbath but more like Technical Ecstasy or Never Say Die.Decided not to buy after hearing some songs on the radio. It is definitely Black Sabbath but more like Technical Ecstasy or Never Say Die. It is not the quality of Paranoid or Volume IV. Expand
  7. Sep 7, 2013
    4
    Infinitely less appealing than The Devil You Know, this latest Black Sabbath album is well-crafted but, in the end, nothing other than aInfinitely less appealing than The Devil You Know, this latest Black Sabbath album is well-crafted but, in the end, nothing other than a monument to boredom. The songs are completely devoid of intensity or energy, and Ozzy sounds unconvincing. Some good instrumental parts are just not enough. Expand

See all 19 User Reviews