Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. Feb 17, 2012
    60
    For the most part, A Flash Flood of Colour revels in a unique, organized chaos, and while it's a demanding and often exhausting listen, it's a call to arms which the flagging U.K. guitar band scene could do with more of.
  2. Feb 10, 2012
    80
    Disenchantment should always be this spellbinding.
  3. Feb 10, 2012
    50
    The positives are overshadowed by petulant observations to politics which is hard to take seriously when dire lyrics like "Yabba dabba do one, Son."
  4. A Flash Flood of Colour is daring, thought provoking, and utterly unpredictable, making it the first bold record of 2012 and Enter Shikari's defining moment.
  5. Jan 20, 2012
    50
    There are occasional moments of brilliance to be found of Flash Flood, often within the carefully crafted melodies of Enter Shikari's choruses, but all too often their lyrical angles and their almost pathological need to force genres together make for an uneven album.
  6. Jan 17, 2012
    70
    In practice and the long term of most, they're hysterically fun, but perhaps easier to admire in the abstract than really adore, unless you're a 17-year-old girl or bored at a festival.
  7. Their festival-friendly rap-rave-metal goes "the-generation-that-are-going-to-change-the-world" political.
  8. 80
    They respond to the challenge [to engage politically] in explosive style to deliver something like their defining statement.
  9. Jan 12, 2012
    50
    A sterile, witless turn here.
  10. Jan 12, 2012
    70
    The group's melding together of dance music, metal riffs, punk energy and vocals that sound English rather than Californian make A Flash Flood of Colour not only a compelling effort, but an appropriately named one to boot.
  11. Feb 1, 2012
    80
    This 11-song set is a good deal of fun to listen to. [14 Jan 2012, p.50]
  12. Jan 18, 2012
    80
    Angry, innovative and often ahead of the curve. [Feb 2012, p.111]
  13. Jan 13, 2012
    90
    Enter Shikari prove that they have something substantial to say and a creative way of saying it.
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 31 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 8
  2. Negative: 0 out of 8
  1. Jan 19, 2012
    10
    This is there best album to date. I first got into Enter Shikari before Take to the Skies was released, when their demos were floating around. 'Take to the Skies' reproduced all of their songs and they were, in my opinion, worse because of it. Common Dreads was an average album with a couple of stand out tracks. A flash flood of colour however is a different kettle of fish. Very easy to listen to from begininning to end, some of the tracks are quite simply stunning. Definitely buy it...now Full Review »
  2. Apr 16, 2013
    4
    Dull uninspired political electronicore garbage. Every song has some underlying problem at the heart of its message like corruption or global warming, there's also some boring electronica in the background behind Rou Reynolds shouting and ranting. The final song Constellations is the stand-out track with an impressive vocal delivery and less of the dull electronics and "breakdowns" prevalent on the album. If this sort of thing suits you, then buy it it is a good album, just not my type of album. Full Review »
  3. Dec 3, 2012
    8
    I'd like to start off by saying that I've been a fan since Take to the Skies as this seems to matter to a lot of people with Enter Shikari now saying that they're bad because they've branched out their genre. Whilst they're often keen to suggest that they are beyond the boundaries of genre I'd call this album Metal-step. Regardless. I think it is incredible. Not a bad song on it, my particular favourite is System Meltdown, which have to be listened to back to back. Similar lyrically in terms of the politics of them to Common Dreads it still makes for an excellent album with a couple of cheeky DnB remixes of ssssssnakepit chucked in for good measure. Full Review »