• Record Label: Vice
  • Release Date: Feb 6, 2007
Metascore
65

Generally favorable reviews - based on 30 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 30
  2. Negative: 0 out of 30
  1. It's smart, strange, just different enough from its predecessor, and, eventually, absolutely stunning.
  2. A Weekend In The City is the aural adaptation, a digital manifestation, of what it’s like to be a twenty-something in Britain, today. It’s dirty, dishevelled, unsure and paranoid; fearful, easily distracted, boisterous and ashamed; reckless, wild, nervous and terrified; graceful, thought-provoking, clumsy and contradictory. And it’s very nearly perfect.
  3. How good is A Weekend In The City? At times, it's brilliant: bold, forthright and honest.
  4. A Weekend in the City showcases what all the band's initial buzz was about, but twists and filters what might have been expected, leaving them open to praise for different reasons.
User Score
6.5

Generally favorable reviews- based on 296 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 68 out of 204
  1. May 12, 2015
    7
    If you are able to detach your preconceptions about Bloc Party based on Silent Alarm, this emerges as an imaginative, attention-grabbing andIf you are able to detach your preconceptions about Bloc Party based on Silent Alarm, this emerges as an imaginative, attention-grabbing and genuinely strong release. Full Review »
  2. May 2, 2015
    6
    For Bloc Party, following up their seminal debut album 'Silent Alarm' was always going to be a challenge. After only two years out of theFor Bloc Party, following up their seminal debut album 'Silent Alarm' was always going to be a challenge. After only two years out of the limelight, 'A Weekend in The City' was released in early 2007. The album definitely sees a progression in Bloc Party's music. It's quite impressive how much they matured musically in just a two year period, with a much more electronically driven sound than 'Silent Alarm'. Despite some notable high points with the music however, it's certainly the lyrics that let this album down. Kyle Okereke trying to be almost too realistic in a lot of these songs, and almost comes across as cringeworthy at times. After getting off to a fairly reasonable start with 'Songs for Clay (Disappear Here)', 'Hunting for Witches' and 'Uniform', the album is somewhat let down by a collection of very weak songs towards its latter stages such as 'Where Is Home', 'Kreuzberg' and 'Sunday'.

    One particular bright spark; the single 'Flux' which was part of the re-release is one of the best songs Bloc Party ever produced. An electronically driven indie classic. Unfortunately, the same can't be said for the entire album, but writing another album which was up to the standards of 'Silent Alarm' was always going to be a challenge in itself.
    Full Review »
  3. Nov 7, 2011
    8
    Supposedly a concept album, this is a very solid follow up to Silent Alarm, showing lots of ambition and progress. This has all theSupposedly a concept album, this is a very solid follow up to Silent Alarm, showing lots of ambition and progress. This has all the ingredients that made the bands debut so enjoyable, and in many places expands and improves on it. However while Kele's vocals have improved slightly, his lyrics here are at times cringeworthy. Sometimes they work and to be fair they do sound very personal and you have to give credit to him for attempting to wear his heart on his sleeve, but most of the time it's teenage poetry drivel. If you don't listen too carefully they probably wont take away from the record, unfortunately I listened a bit too carefully. Musically excellent though. Full Review »