Alela Diane & Wild Divine


Generally favorable reviews - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 0 out of 12
Buy On
  1. Apr 12, 2011
    Backed by a solid country-rock band (including two guitarists who claim co-writing credits on more than half the songs), her new sound is perhaps more indebted to Nashville than the West Coast's folk scene, but it sounds its best in the neutral territory between both camps, neither subscribing to nor rebelling against any single genre.
  2. Apr 12, 2011
    This is a vivid selection of songs underscored by a bittersweet poetry.
  3. Mojo
    May 18, 2011
    There was mmuch to anticipate, but it falls short of the promise. [May 2011, p.114]
  4. Apr 12, 2011
    Wild Divine finds Diane attempting new approaches to production and arrangement and should perhaps be seen as a transitional album. At the moment, the performances from within her comfort zone remain the most effective.
  5. 70
    Wild Divine ain't 'Kid A', but it's hardly musical stagnation.
  6. Apr 12, 2011
    This self-titled album gives the impression that they're constantly aware of holding back. Such restraint is ultimately unwarranted: Diane is a strong enough presence as a singer and as a songwriter that she can more than hold her own.
  7. Apr 12, 2011
    She has toned down the extreme vocal expressions found on previous records and settled into more of a groove. That's a shame, because while each track has merit, Diane needs to add more variety to make the album always compelling.
  8. Q Magazine
    May 18, 2011
    While the songwriting stays high, it's her strong but sensitive voice, with its lonesome hint of yodeling, that captivates. [May 2011, p.115]
  9. Apr 12, 2011
    If Diane's songs are more accessible, they're still not easy, creating the Inception-like sensation of wandering around in someone's overheated brain, where urgency and a lack of clarity intertwine to disorienting effect.
  10. Apr 12, 2011
    Musically, her new direction is colourful, with electric guitar brazen against pedal steel and slide, retro keyb oards shimmering next to bluegrass-hued banjo and accordion. But the result is surprisingly lightweight.
  11. The voice (Joni Mitchell meets Anna Calvi), is as tough and tender as before but the music now acts as a bouncy counterpoint to songs with lyrics such as "death is a hard act to follow", blurring the line between unsettling and uplifting nicely.
  12. Uncut
    Apr 13, 2011
    Occasionally, though, the songs resemble fragments of poetry, signifying little more than unfocused emotions, with Diane undecided about whether to be pretty or strange. [May 2011, p.82]

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