• Record Label: MCA
  • Release Date: Mar 13, 2001
User Score
9.1

Universal acclaim- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 10
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 10
  3. Negative: 0 out of 10

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  1. BrianaK.
    Jul 6, 2001
    10
    Pure talent when it comes to playing and songwriting!
  2. MatthewS.
    Mar 16, 2002
    7
    Semisonic are an easy target for barb-tounged critics because their music is simple, sweet, and, yes, a little sappy at times. But if you are willing to suspend your judgment long enough to enjoy Dan Wilson's gorgeous songwriting and the band's varied sonic textures, you might find something you like on "All About Chemistry."
  3. JohnC
    Jun 15, 2005
    10
    Outstanding Pop Album. The songwriting on this album makes me feel really good
  4. JamesE
    Jan 8, 2006
    10
    Simply one of the best albums ever
  5. PhilipJ
    Dec 11, 2005
    10
    I don't know how anybody can give bad critisism to this album, as there is certainly no room for it.
  6. Nov 30, 2013
    10
    This was one of my favorite albums of that year (2001), and of that decade (2000s). Excellent songwriting, musicianship and production. I'm surprised that the title track never became a mega-hit; it is a pop-rock classic in my book.
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 1 out of 12
  1. 70
    What it all boils down to is songs. Just as overproduction provides the perfect mask for some bands' mediocrity, the utter simplicity of this recording is the ideal way to reveal Semisonic's renewed inspiration.
  2. Chemistry works precisely because of Semisonic's skillful management of cliche, particularly Wilson's ability to elevate ordinary story lines with buoyant melodies.
  3. But if "Chemistry" is a pure-pop sugar rush, much of what follows is equally sour, often falling into the thematic trap that snares so many post-hit albums: lots of songs about how success is really hard on rock stars and their girlfriends.