Amanda Palmer Goes Down Under Image
Metascore
74

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: The second full-length solo release for the Dresden Dolls singer includes several live tracks recorded in Australia and New Zealand.
  • Record Label: Liberation
  • Genre(s): Vocal, Pop/Rock, Alternative/Indie Rock, Alternative Pop/Rock, Cabaret, Nouvelle Chanson
  • More Details and Credits »
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. It's touching, witty, and like everything else the Bostonian ever does, brilliant.
  2. 80
    Amanda Palmer Goes Down Under is, simply, a lot of fun. Some of that fun might most appeal to the countries it's directed at, but those feeling no particular kinship to Australia or New Zealand will still find Amanda's quirkiness endearing.
  3. Mar 1, 2011
    75
    The whole album feels like an enjoyable trifle cranked out for the hell of it.
  4. Mar 1, 2011
    70
    If you ignore the obvious filler and give it time to wash over, Amanda Palmer Goes Down Under is an enjoyable set of songs that will linger long in the memory.
  5. Mar 1, 2011
    70
    This disc may not attract those who have always found Palmer a bit affected and showy. She still is. But she clearly knows how to please an audience and understands the importance of more than just playing to the crowd.
  6. Dec 20, 2011
    60
    For her second solo album, the Dresden Dolls' Amanda Palmer slapped together an album-full of songs about Australia and New Zealand to coincide with her 2011 tour of the Australian continent.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Jun 11, 2011
    8
    This album was a lot of fun, but if you've never heard the artist before, go pick up "Who Killed Amanda Palmer" first. That being said, AFP delivers on a lot of fronts consistently. The album has a wide variation of styles, but each song is solid. About half of the the album is for funsies (Ex. Vegemite (The Black Death)), the other half is slightly more serious/contemplative (On an Unknown Beach), but it is all experimental. There's a ton of collaboration in this album. The lyrics are well composed, and just the right amounts of pre-song banter were put in to make the listener feel right at home without making you wait 5 minutes just to hear the song. If I had to nitpick this album, I would say that some of the songs felt less polished than usual (coughcoughDoctorOzcough), and the album doesn't seem to pull itself into a cohesive whole very well. That said, this album isn't just about the music. It's about how the music was made. :) Viva la Revolucion! Collapse