• Record Label: Sub Pop
  • Release Date: Aug 20, 2013
User Score
6.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 13 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 13
  2. Negative: 2 out of 13

Review this album

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Aug 20, 2013
    5
    As the band that recorded Weirdo Rippers and Nouns, An Object does not necessarily strike you as the work of the same group. Gone is the noise background and reverb, and what we are left with painfully disappoints. What bothers me the most are the vocals. It may be that they are mixed higher so you can hear the imperfection in their singing, but No Ages delivery on vocals seem bored andAs the band that recorded Weirdo Rippers and Nouns, An Object does not necessarily strike you as the work of the same group. Gone is the noise background and reverb, and what we are left with painfully disappoints. What bothers me the most are the vocals. It may be that they are mixed higher so you can hear the imperfection in their singing, but No Ages delivery on vocals seem bored and lazy, and since they dominate the soundscape the entire album feels drab. The best moments on this album are when No Age actually moves away from their old sound, instead of half assing, such as on C'mon Stimmung, which sounds ferocious with roaring guitar and crashing cymbals. Without some of these primal punk elements on the rest of the tracks, it seems like punk without the energy, and what is that? Expand
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 35 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 35
  2. Negative: 0 out of 35
  1. Jan 27, 2014
    40
    With songs this weak, Randall's Norfolk-flat voice has nowhere to hide. [Oct 2013, p.107]
  2. Oct 25, 2013
    60
    No Age has made an album devoid of joy, yet I couldn’t help but smile when listening to it.
  3. Sep 25, 2013
    80
    Even the twosome's weakest album has undeniable substance in its slow burn. Don't call the Yes Age just yet. [No. 102, p.58]