band red

  • Record Label: SpinArt
  • Release Date: May 20, 2003
User Score
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User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1

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  1. BlancoA.
    May 2, 2004
    10
    I just can't stop playing this album, and I'm eager to get their debut. This is definitely a band to see live, but their unusual, often dischordant sound certainly does shine through on the disc. Although she's compared to the lead singer of the Yeah Yeah Yeas, I would have to say that Nikki Colk's sound is truly original. If you're in the mood for something new, I just can't stop playing this album, and I'm eager to get their debut. This is definitely a band to see live, but their unusual, often dischordant sound certainly does shine through on the disc. Although she's compared to the lead singer of the Yeah Yeah Yeas, I would have to say that Nikki Colk's sound is truly original. If you're in the mood for something new, pick up the album. It's so choice. Expand

Awards & Rankings

Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 12
  2. Negative: 0 out of 12
  1. The Wire
    80
    Band Red suggests they have reached meltdown and anybody encountering their post-punk roar would be advised to stand well back. [#243, p.74]
  2. Though it's not quite as immediate as their excellent debut album, You've Seen Us...You Must've Seen Us, KaitO U.K.'s band red delivers more tightly coiled post-punk-pop with shouty vocals and elastic guitars, and also delves deeper into the group's experimental side.
  3. Liliput is the analogy even if Nikki Colk has never heard of them either. Kaito are noisier, faster, girlier; Colk mispronounces her English not as a Marlene Marder homage but so people will think she's from Sweden. But the two share a rare, rambunctious sense that noise is fun and life is livable.