Brothers

  • Record Label: Nonesuch
  • Release Date: May 18, 2010
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 205 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 4 out of 205

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  1. Sep 30, 2010
    6
    Looking for a little less production assistance...some more guitars. I've loved previous albums, but it's beginning to slope downwards.
  2. Dec 3, 2013
    5
    [5.9] The Black Keys could be thoroughly enjoyable if they didn't make such nostalgic records. I can imagine myself enjoying all of the songs on this album, but it is far too reliant on cliches. The songs also suffer from a lack of variation, especially in tempo, instrumentation, and vocals. While almost all of the songs on here are agreeably catchy, and not difficult to listen to, there[5.9] The Black Keys could be thoroughly enjoyable if they didn't make such nostalgic records. I can imagine myself enjoying all of the songs on this album, but it is far too reliant on cliches. The songs also suffer from a lack of variation, especially in tempo, instrumentation, and vocals. While almost all of the songs on here are agreeably catchy, and not difficult to listen to, there isn't much interesting about this album; it is plain, repetitive, and doesn't offer much beyond a few listens. Expand
Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 31 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 29 out of 31
  2. Negative: 0 out of 31
  1. That’s the great thing about the Black Keys in general and Brothers in particular: the past and present intermingle so thoroughly that they blur, yet there’s no affect, just three hundred pounds of joy.
  2. Brimful of air guitar moments and other guilty pleasures, Brothers is pleasingly diverse and diverting, with barely a duff track.
  3. Six albums in, the Akron, Ohio, duo's backwoods-Zeppelin shtick remains paramount, but on Brothers, there's a new kind of shrewdness, too: real songwriting, and real hooks, beneath all that mondo riffage.