Camp

User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 167 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 13 out of 167
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  1. Jun 25, 2014
    4
    I WANTED YOU TO KNOW, WHENEVER YOU ARE AROUND, I CANT SPEAK I CANT SPEAK!!!!

    MY HEARTBEAT MY HEARTBEAT

    MAN, f**k YOU N****... FU** YOU Ni**A!

    least favourite track: heartbeat
  2. Jul 1, 2012
    5
    Overrated album for sure. Some catchy songs, my favorite is Fire Fly. Lyrics are terrible and cheesy, cringe-worthy, but the music is quite good. I love Donald Glover on Community love his stand ups, but his music not so much. It's cool that he's trying things though and taking risks.
  3. Dec 10, 2011
    6
    It's okay. Glover's pop/rap styling is obviously very derivative, and his lyrics are honestly quite awful. However, his flow isn't anything I couldn't describe as "magical".
  4. Nov 28, 2011
    6
    Childish Gambino (Donald Glover) begins his 'Camp' by rapping about growing up in the projects, not wishing to conform to black or white stereotypes and wanting to **** as many girls as possible (Asian girls to be specific). This limited subject matter extends across of the entirety of the record layer over brilliantly produced Kanye-esk rhythms and beats (bar the terrible electro trackChildish Gambino (Donald Glover) begins his 'Camp' by rapping about growing up in the projects, not wishing to conform to black or white stereotypes and wanting to **** as many girls as possible (Asian girls to be specific). This limited subject matter extends across of the entirety of the record layer over brilliantly produced Kanye-esk rhythms and beats (bar the terrible electro track 'Heartbeat'). Glover is certainly a very gifted rapper exhibiting highly skilled delivery and has a fresh perspective on hip-hop, but some of his lyrics really hold 'Camp' back. Every track on the album contains at least four pop-culture references too many, with Glover forcing his 'nerd' image too hard ("That's why I come first like my cell phone" - Groan). Although a number of these certainly succeed ("Mm Food like Rapp Snitch Knishes, Cuz its oreos, twinkies, coconuts, delicious" - ****ing Genius). In addition, his constant flips between his hopeless romantic and **** personas also feel rather false, especially in the wake of contemporaries such as Tyler, the Creator .

    Mostly, the album falls short because Glover seems to have been over-ambisious in his blue-print for his first studio album. His heartfelt descriptions of racial profiling from both blacks and white is delivered brilliantly as are his tales of chasing girls and growing up poor. However, his over the top love/hate relationship with fame and wish to come across as a notorious girlfriend-theif at the same time as being a loveable nerd, seem as if he is looking up to rappers his senior rather than writing from his own headspace.

    Overall 'Camp' is an interesting yet flawed album from an incredibly promising young rapper, who is still trying to find himself. It will probably pump out of the ipods of Cudi-kids who 'aren't that into rap' but slip past those well versed in hip-hop. The album's conclusion ('That Power') points to something that could be really special but isn't all there yet. Hopefully in his followup, he will capitalise on his strengths.
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  5. Nov 17, 2011
    5
    The production is pretty good, but unfortunately the rapping isnt there for me.

    He excels on tracks like bonfire, but then everything falls apart and blends into one big monotonous disaster.
Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 27 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 27
  2. Negative: 1 out of 27
  1. Mojo
    May 31, 2012
    80
    The identity-crisis themed Camp trumps through whip-smart intelligence, comic brio and bristling malign intent. [Jan 2012, p.90]
  2. Under The Radar
    Jan 19, 2012
    70
    The star here is Glover's malleability, as he can move from a club banger such as "Heartbeat" to something as sensitive as "All the Shine," a plaintive, yearning song about his own shortcomings. [#39, p. 75]
  3. It's less surefire than Culdesac. But it's more satisfying emotionally.