Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 22 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 22
  2. Negative: 0 out of 22
  1. Feb 15, 2011
    90
    He may just have produced his best album.
  2. Feb 15, 2011
    90
    Mike Skinner seems to have produced a funny, sad, emotional, honest album to rank up there with his very finest work, making us fall in love with him all over again, just as he leaves us.
  3. Feb 15, 2011
    90
    For sheer instant appeal, the winner has to be Cyberspace and Reds, which is clearly one of the most bizarre, absurd, and exhilarating records dropped in 2011, while Computers and Blues requires a great deal of thought and introspection before it can be truly valued.
  4. Dec 19, 2011
    80
    Based on the theme of technology and the power it holds over modern life, its 14 tracks showcase Skinner's trademark hip-hop witticisms.
  5. Mar 1, 2011
    80
    His fifth and final Streets album turns into his best since "A Grand Don't Come For Free." [Feb 2011, p.123]
  6. 80
    It's ultimately hard not to like an album that features not one but two epiphanies, one experienced lying on the "Roof of Your Car" staring at the stars, while in album closer "Lock the Locks" a dream prompts Skinner's sudden change of career--an event engagingly depicted as an office farewell party.
  7. Feb 15, 2011
    80
    Thematically tight, thought-provoking and packed with tunes, it is, once again, far in advance of most pop in 2011. What a way to go.
  8. 80
    From its cover in, there's a knowing, bustling swagger to The Streets' finale, if only in its relishing of a quick dart for the exit.
  9. 70
    Even though it's not quite his best album, Computers and Blues catches the Streets at the best he's been in years.
  10. Feb 15, 2011
    70
    Computers & Blues doesn't match up to The Streets' visionary early promise, and there are a few songs which sound sketchy and half-hearted. But when it works, it's a reminder of what a tender, articulate and original voice Skinner has been in British pop, and how sorely he will be missed.
  11. Feb 15, 2011
    70
    Still confused but back on form, The Streets' final album (Skinner wants to make a film) sees a return to garage beats and square-eyed observations from a life staring at pixels on screens.
  12. Feb 15, 2011
    70
    It's not unreasonable to assume he's generally hit the mark with Computers and Blues, a heavy collection of songs with the inimitable Skinner sense of style and substance.
  13. Feb 15, 2011
    67
    Fortunately, Computers is more farewell party than funeral, and Skinner keeps things appropriately lively.
  14. This may be a confused record, but it finds its place through a universal truth it manages to hit: so Skinner can't quite find his way in this world: who among us can?
  15. Apr 4, 2011
    60
    It's a fine bookend for a man who defined one parochial corner of the music world. [Mar 2011, p.96]
  16. Feb 18, 2011
    60
    The production on this unfocused album is, as usual, nothing mind-blowing. Still, Skinner has an insightful charm and a lyrical gift that makes this a respectable send-off.
  17. Feb 15, 2011
    60
    Computers and Blues is inimitable, flawed, and perhaps a suitable way to bow out.
  18. Feb 18, 2011
    59
    Overall, Skinner sounds bored and tired of himself-in short, ready to move on.
  19. Feb 28, 2011
    57
    A collection of lesser beats and hooks that somewhat returns to Original Pirate Material's sonics, Computers and Blues sadly trades that record's wonderful sense of place for a foggy vagueness that leaves Skinner's insights mostly impenetrable.
  20. Mar 29, 2011
    50
    In the end, the album is a collection of songs, mostly good, some indifferent, and all a hundred times more honest than, say, Rihanna. But it's all really to no transcendent purpose.
  21. Feb 15, 2011
    50
    Computers and Blues, ultimately, just passes the test with a studious recount. It is neither atrociously bad nor staggeringly good: no stand-outs, no teeth-clenching clunkers. It is just okay.
  22. Feb 18, 2011
    40
    The fifth and final Streets albums suffers as a result of his self-imposed exile from the hubbub he once chronicled with such verve. [Mar 2011, p.101]
User Score
7.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 4
  2. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. Jan 26, 2012
    6
    Thought the album had a strange sound to it which is strangely appealing but this nothing on The Streets previous albums, a littleThought the album had a strange sound to it which is strangely appealing but this nothing on The Streets previous albums, a little disappointed. The album seems to be full of fillers for me with only one outstanding track which is Going Through Hell. Full Review »
  2. Mar 22, 2011
    8
    A return to form! Skinner sounds like he's having fun again, and even if the album lacks A Grand Don't Come for Free's absorbing cinematicA return to form! Skinner sounds like he's having fun again, and even if the album lacks A Grand Don't Come for Free's absorbing cinematic scope, it is a solid Streets album, funny and poignant in equal measure. Shame he's calling it quits. Full Review »
  3. Mar 11, 2011
    4
    What a lacklustre retirement. If Skinner is as bored of the Streets name and intonation, then why bother with a final album? It's the sound ofWhat a lacklustre retirement. If Skinner is as bored of the Streets name and intonation, then why bother with a final album? It's the sound of a former rabble-rouser deserted by his old posse, left alone in his concrete chasm, riffing his own poetry over MySpace friends music output. Full Review »