• Record Label: Warp
  • Release Date: May 4, 2010
Metascore
86

Universal acclaim - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 26
  2. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. Flying Lotus has made the strongest album to date with his amazing collection of sounds, beats and instruments; as good as you felt after hearing the sheer brilliance of "Los Angeles."
  2. Flying Lotus reaches into the past in order to create something clearly of the future – a hybridized work that challenges others to follow its dazzling blueprint.
  3. Time will tell if "Cosmogramma" is the most definitive moment of his career, but at this point it seems the realm of electronic music is open for Flying Lotus to be the next big visionary of his genre.
  4. Part of its delight is how naturally the disparate parts fit together, but another part is how they add up to phantasmagoria if you let your attention wander (and don't be a tight-ass‑-you should).
  5. Flying Lotus, much like Yorke, Greenwood & Co., has made a definitive summary of a decade's worth of advances in electronic music, a release that transcends genre and deserves to become a glorified phenomena by those who experience it.
  6. Cosmogramma is futurist in form, rather than content. Reliving the future's past through a constellation of references to cosmic jazz, psychedelic funk, hip-hop, and techno, the music of Flying Lotus never fixates long enough to crystallize; any groove that spontaneously emerges is quickly subverted, churned up in favor of a creating new maps and new vectors.
  7. Cosmogramma is an instrumental genre-jumping journey for head-bopping intellectuals, and the meditative melodies by vocalists Thundercat, Laura Darlington and Thom Yorke only add to the experience.
  8. The surprising achievement of Cosmogramma is how capably it reinterprets that kind of innately communal vibe into private introspection without losing a bit of its energy along the way.
  9. On Cosmogramma, this never-ending stream of aural textures sounds effortless, and the enthralling swirl of jazz, drum 'n' bass, dubstep and hip-hop beckons you toward the edge of something damn near cosmic.
  10. Cosmogramma is an intricate, challenging record that fuses his loves-- jazz, hip-hop, videogame sounds, IDM-- into something unique. It's an album in the truest sense.
  11. Cosmogramma may evade complete comprehension, but Flying Lotus' foreign and colorful arrangements entice even the most casual listener.
  12. Yet, even though the steady presence of featured performances helps beautify Cosmogramma, this is essentially Ellison's crowning achievement. The album is sequenced with a sense of purpose, evidential from the promo being presented as a long continuous track.
  13. Cosmogramma bursts with inventiveness; I've found myself careening around my apartment to sounds I don't recognize as of this Earth. That Lotus takes these vibrant ideas and sets them to pulses that move asses is incredible. Apparently everyone else is bouncing along in agreement.
User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 102 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 14
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 14
  3. Negative: 0 out of 14
  1. Oct 6, 2012
    10
    The best electronic album since Untrue. FlyLo blends a number of different styles together very effectively to create a unique, immersiveThe best electronic album since Untrue. FlyLo blends a number of different styles together very effectively to create a unique, immersive soundscape. This album seizes your brain and doesn't let go for 45 minutes of pure awesomeness, leaving you a more complete, enlightened person than you were before. There's so much to discover on this album, and it only continues to sound better every time I listen to it. Even if you're not really into electronic music, you should check this out. It's unique, progressive, and incredibly fun. Full Review »
  2. j30
    Dec 6, 2011
    6
    Sensory overload is how I'd describe this record from the California based producer Steven Ellison. There are certainly highs and lows, allSensory overload is how I'd describe this record from the California based producer Steven Ellison. There are certainly highs and lows, all happening within seconds of each other. Sometimes it works, but for the most part it's a mess not worth picking up. Full Review »
  3. Jan 21, 2015
    8
    This album has all the ideas of Los Angeles, but I feel like it's more scatterbrained and restless. Instead of tracks following any logicalThis album has all the ideas of Los Angeles, but I feel like it's more scatterbrained and restless. Instead of tracks following any logical progression, sounds are thrown at the listener in any order. Still, the soundscapes created are fantastic, and the album lives up to its title. I prefer LA, but this is nice for different reasons. Full Review »