Cross

  • Record Label: Vice
  • Release Date: Jul 10, 2007
Metascore
81

Universal acclaim - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 25
  2. Negative: 0 out of 25
  1. At its core, Cross is loud, restless, and daring. A creative tour de force, Justice have unleashed an era-defining album for the children of acid house.
  2. An engaging study in contrasts and a killer party record.
  3. Rough-edged and overdriven in the right places, super-slick as their Reagan-era new-wave touchstones elsewhere, this pomo-funk concoction from Xavier de Rosnay and Gaspard Augé is like a French kiss from Sonny Crockett.
  4. Cross is a harsh and mostly instrumental set that nonetheless plays like the ideal crossover electronic-pop record. Justice knows how to sequence a dance album to avoid drag and boredom.
  5. Cross is a big party record with a few exciting beats, as well as one of the few examples of desirable audio clipping.
  6. If you want to get in on the ground floor of something good, then check out Cross and see where Justice leads; with cuts like these, it will certainly not take long until they're all over the place, in commercials, on the radio, and on TV.
  7. Justice know when to curtail the industrial strike and dazzle you with some star-skipping pop-chime, or a warble of gloopy future funk, before tossing you back into the unlit mire.
  8. Cross is an album that applies a modern Big Beat aesthetic to an army of ‘80s keyboards. Because of this, the album never sounds dated, but always familiar.
  9. The grooves are gnarly and congested, the synth riffs are distorted howls and the samples are torn from Devo and horror-soundtracking prog-rockers Goblin.
  10. Justice essentially have two modes: funky techno built with filthy overdriven synth sounds and gleefully daft disco/'80s pastiche so shiny as to be almost reflective. Both are held together with a studio rigour that makes the record bounce out of the speakers so forcefully that the moments of synthesis, where the sound coheres into its trademark elastic groove, become utterly addictive.
  11. Perhaps the most successful aspect of Cross is its appeal on both the dance floor and the headphones, the pounding rhythms complemented by the nuanced detail of the arrangements and unified flow of mood.
  12. 80
    “Waters Of Nazareth” yawns like a car crusher, mashing hip-hop, electro and funk into gleaming slabs of sound, while “D.A.N.C.E” displays a lighter touch, channelling Chic disco in a whirl of sugary keyboards and euphoric violin stabs.
  13. The whole album is solid, save for Uffie's questionable club princess rap, and even that sounds better with repeated listens.
  14. Admirably random samples dug up from underground sources like '70s Italian prog-rockers Goblin, combined with a reckless abandon and an adherence to melodic hooks, makes Cross one of the most interesting electro-crossovers since Ratatat, and the guys in Justice do an excellent job building on Daft Punk's innovative foundation.
  15. Layers of production can obscure the organic--or at least faux-organic--sounds of a ripping performance. That's not the case on the debut full-length album from French house duo Justice, whose complex, dark, and heavily pop-rock-influenced dance tracks span banging disco grooves to instrumental electro-funk space operas to minimalist hip-hop.
  16. Justice does appear to be that rare breed of dance artist equally capable of stimulating the body and the mind, though neither Richard James nor the Basement Jaxx need fear this act.
  17. 80
    Xavier de Rosnay and Gaspard Augé employ everything from ominous Christian iconography to slick future sounds to prop up their aura of overarching coolness.
  18. It's all very controlled, as any functional dance club record should be, and its quality extends past its single, as any decent-to-good dance club record should be.
  19. Ultimately, Justice is another example of rearranging and reshuffling the devices of the past, but with complete understanding of their effectiveness to a point that sounds fresh.
  20. With loads of melodrama and not a moment of subtlety, Justice define the new-jacques swing.
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 114 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 44 out of 48
  2. Negative: 2 out of 48
  1. GuillaumeF
    Apr 8, 2009
    10
    I was nearly crying when listening to the rubbishy Daft Punk's Human After All. Two years later, Justice's Cross made me smile I was nearly crying when listening to the rubbishy Daft Punk's Human After All. Two years later, Justice's Cross made me smile again. There are no highlight here that can come up with Around the World or Digital love (although DVNO and Let there be Light aren't that far), but it's overall better : there's not a single weak track ! It's maybe not quite innovative, of course, but what it does, it does it very, very well. That deserves a 10 in my opinion. Full Review »
  2. SeanP.
    Aug 19, 2007
    10
    Sometimes derivative, sometimes exceptionally original and forward thinking, but always pretty unique and different, and better and more Sometimes derivative, sometimes exceptionally original and forward thinking, but always pretty unique and different, and better and more consistent than most music out there. It's one of my favorite electronica albums of the decade, and I'm a fan of Four Tet, Junior Boys, DIzzie Rascal, The Streets, and Caribou. Full Review »
  3. Sep 6, 2013
    9
    Justice stick out like a sore thumb when it comes to electro. They use all of the tried and true formulas to making a dance hit, yet it never,Justice stick out like a sore thumb when it comes to electro. They use all of the tried and true formulas to making a dance hit, yet it never, ever sounds uncreative or generic. This album is very distinct, as the use of a loud and gritty synth is used on nearly all the tracks (D.A.N.C.E being the only one without it) sometimes it is used in short stabs (Stress) and sometimes it is used as the lead of the track (Genesis, Phantom pt.1, Waters of Nazareth) This is great because now Justice have a very handy factor; a signature sound. The most Justice-y tracks (Waters of Nazareth, Phantom part 1 and 2, Genesis) are by far the best, with the vocal tracks DVNO and D.A.N.C.E. being radio and dancefloor friendly. (Save for Uffie's terrible contribution on Tthhee Ppaarrttyy which would have been better as an instrumental). Full Review »