Dear Science,

User Score
9.0

Universal acclaim- based on 248 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 5 out of 248

Review this album

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Tab
    Oct 4, 2008
    2
    Occasionally, when he isn't pulling the talk-singing style, his voice breaks into Prince's effeminate falsetto. Dark, electronic music with high production. The message is: "If you don't like this album then you're not worthy of it." And you know what? That just make me want to tell pretentious horseshit like this to fuck off.
  2. bastu
    Oct 8, 2008
    0
    Everyone seems to failed to have noticed that it has none of the intricacy, charm or, god forbid, personality that made all of their previous music so good. Beautiful layered vocals or sitek's oft hailed instrumentation, no bugger that... get a drum machine and sing "he's a what? he's a what? he's a newspaper man and he gets his best ideas from a newspaper stand". I Everyone seems to failed to have noticed that it has none of the intricacy, charm or, god forbid, personality that made all of their previous music so good. Beautiful layered vocals or sitek's oft hailed instrumentation, no bugger that... get a drum machine and sing "he's a what? he's a what? he's a newspaper man and he gets his best ideas from a newspaper stand". I despair. And who knows what's wrong with all you people claiming it's the best thing since sliced bread... Depressing. Expand
  3. GLC
    Feb 4, 2009
    0
    Cliffy B - the reason you can't listen to this album is because it's overcompressed. That's right - David Sitek decided to follow in the footsteps of "mainstream" bands and make his band physically unlistenable on any sort of half-decent sound system. Suffice to say, I will not be buying the next album without thorough research. I loved Cookie Mountain, but I won't Cliffy B - the reason you can't listen to this album is because it's overcompressed. That's right - David Sitek decided to follow in the footsteps of "mainstream" bands and make his band physically unlistenable on any sort of half-decent sound system. Suffice to say, I will not be buying the next album without thorough research. I loved Cookie Mountain, but I won't listen to another track from this crapfest again. Expand
  4. CliffyB
    Dec 17, 2008
    2
    Two words: pure GARBAGE. I'm sorry, I really loved (exactly) three tunes off of "Return to Cookie Mountain", so I was looking forward to at least, oh, maybe ONE song that I could play with some volume without being embarrassed. I bought this, popped it into my CD player, and resisted the temptation to hit FAST FORWARD a good 15 seconds into every song. I forced myself to listen to Two words: pure GARBAGE. I'm sorry, I really loved (exactly) three tunes off of "Return to Cookie Mountain", so I was looking forward to at least, oh, maybe ONE song that I could play with some volume without being embarrassed. I bought this, popped it into my CD player, and resisted the temptation to hit FAST FORWARD a good 15 seconds into every song. I forced myself to listen to this festering squirrel turd of an album and now I want my wasted life back! TV on the Radio needs to either lay off the drugs, or switch to another form of intoxication, because these songs make me physically ill! Expand
Metascore
88

Universal acclaim - based on 40 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 38 out of 40
  2. Negative: 0 out of 40
  1. There’s a sense of purpose here, of direction and clarity, shafts of accessibility that relegate the din to the background without ever compromising the potentially hostile underbelly of the band’s core sound.
  2. 90
    Throughout Dear Science, TV on the Radio--which includes the rhythm section of bassist Gerard Smith and drummer Jaleel Bunton--flesh out Adebimpe's and Malone's ruminations with relentlessly inventive arrangements that make even familiar sentiments seem fresh.
  3. On Dear Science, TVOTR finds a more traditional consistency, transmuting that dirty experimentalism into a lush cleanliness that eases--rather than hurls--its songs into the art-making ether.