Metascore
71

Generally favorable reviews - based on 30 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 30
  2. Negative: 0 out of 30
  1. It isn't long before you realize how frickin' right it all sounds, how damn near flawless the tone of the whole set feels. [28 Sep 2007, p.104]
  2. There's no getting away from the fact that the goofy guy who used to play drums for Nirvana just made a classic album.
  3. 90
    What remains are incredibly sharp and distorted fist-pumpers, chock full of guitars and monstrous drums, and a handful of slower numbers that fall short of matching the impact of songs like 'Everlong' and 'Learn to Fly.'
  4. 80
    It's charming, understated and has to be heard in context. [Oct 2007, p.100]
  5. Each of these tracks makes the case for Foo Fighters' horizons successfully expanding, in the way the acoustic side of "In Your Honor" didn't. [Oct 2007, p.87]
  6. The Foos' sixth and most accomplished album sees the band comfortable with arena tricks such as wistful Led Zeppelin-y acoustic guitars and choruses to learn and scream.
  7. The record sounds lush and epic, with a variety of genres and sounds all peeking their heads through the band’s established heavy-melodic-rock sound. There are mellow, intimate tunes and amps-to-11 anthems alike, and plenty that split the difference.
  8. On their sixth album, Foo Fighters have renewed their membership in the "if it ain't broke . . ." school of songwriting. And essentially, there's nothing wrong with that.
  9. Ten years later, they've regrouped with Norton for a disc that's more sophisticated and diverse, if a tad less rockin'.
  10. This is not the best Foo Fighters record, but it’s the shrewdest one.
  11. Dave Grohl and company have assembled a strong assortment of the band's familiar, well-built tuneage, from muscular rockers and sinuous ballads to good-natured power-pop and riff-heavy radio anthems.
  12. The instrumental "Ballad of the Beaconsfield Miners" showcases Grohl's acoustic guitar chops, while the piano-driven "Home" provides a lovely ending to an excellent album.
  13. Grohl often shows off his sky-high vocal range, award-winning ear for bridges and choruses and penchant for ending opuses with dark, pitch-perfect shrieks.
  14. Grohl is hookier than Nickelback, which is saying something.
  15. The remainder of Echoes is considerably more diffuse, engaging in levels of genre-hopping that might seem a little desperate were it not for the fact that most of the songs hold up.
  16. By and large this is as consistent a record as the Foo Fighters have ever made.
  17. This is an anthology of strong new songs by a great bunch of bands, all calling themselves Foo Fighters.
  18. This is another fine album from Grohl and company.
  19. Foo Fighters’ sixth studio album is a transitional rather than definitive piece of work, but one that sees them growing older with 'patience and grace'.
  20. 60
    On the last Foos album, "In Your Honour" rock and acoustic music were exiled to different discs. Here, a satisfactory compromise is brokered between the two: the excellent 'Summer's End' is easy on the ear, easier still on the brain, and sets him up in the radio-friendly 'Wonderwall' district one imagines is his spiritual home.
  21. The Foos can sometimes feel like a bit of a chore if they lean too heavily in one direction--as they do here, where despite the conscious blend of acoustic and electric tunes, the rockers weigh down Echoes more than they should, enough to make this seem like just another Foo Fighters album instead of the consolidation of strengths that it was intended to be.
  22. 60
    Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace is another quality entry in a fantastically average career.
  23. Echoes sounds pretty business-as-usual.
  24. Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace sticks to what it's good at: undemanding arena rock that's just--just--leftfield enough not to jar alongside Grohl's previous incarnation.
  25. Echoes has some characteristic Foo Fighters rockers, but even they sound quieter: Producer Gil Norton keeps the guitars, along with everything else, subdued. And without the usual standout hits (though 'Long Road To Ruin' is solid), Echoes will probably leave fans wanting.
  26. 50
    Throughout, the Foos are as tight as ever, even if the songs are mostly unmemorable. [Oct 2007, p.108]
  27. The album is just standard rock/alternative affair.
  28. They're sounding less and less relatable, leaving us pining not just for the days of a little grunge trio from Seattle, but for the relentlessly catchy and charismatic Dave Grohl of the Foos' still-fantastic self-titled debut and the better half of "The Colour and the Shape."
  29. Foo Fighters are now flabby, creaky, and worst of all past it.
  30. Grohl and Company sound like Bob Seger fronting for your garden variety modern hard rock group.
User Score
7.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 116 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 55 out of 68
  2. Negative: 8 out of 68
  1. Dec 11, 2012
    8
    This is a great album. Is it Foo Fighters' best, hmmm not really, but it is still excellent. The main single and first track - The pretender, will be a classic for years to come. Other gems include the quick rising build-up songs - Let it die, Come alive and But honestly, the casual and catchy - Summer's end and Long road to ruin and the stunningly beautiful acoustic ballad - Stranger things have happened. I would recommend this album to all Foo fighter fans, fans of Rock music and well...all general music lovers. Full Review »
  2. Dec 21, 2011
    8
    I'm not a major Foo Fighters fan - appreciate some of their best tracks but overall wouldn't be a favourite of mine, however this is a really good album. Probably the bands most consistent from start to finish. Full Review »
  3. BerndK
    May 30, 2009
    9
    A very good Album. The best Foo Fighter Album so far. It's no bad song on this Album.