User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 12 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 12
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 12
  3. Negative: 1 out of 12

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  1. Nov 24, 2012
    10
    This is one of those rare albums that can change your life. I have had this album for over three years and every time I listen to it I find something new. It is the only album I own that never gets old. Some have called it pretentious. I find it very poetic. The below lyric from the song Shampoo is something you would read in the best contemporary poetry of our time. Combine thatThis is one of those rare albums that can change your life. I have had this album for over three years and every time I listen to it I find something new. It is the only album I own that never gets old. Some have called it pretentious. I find it very poetic. The below lyric from the song Shampoo is something you would read in the best contemporary poetry of our time. Combine that with some of the most infectious music imaginable and you start to understand the power of this album:

    yellow is the color of my true love's crossbow, yellow is the color of the sun
    and black is the color of, a strangled rainbow
    that's the color of my loss.

    I am only sorry that Perkins has virtually disappeared from touring and music and I hope that he returns with more.
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Metascore
74

Generally favorable reviews - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. is still the same Perkins who turned misery into moving music several years ago, but he's learned to dress up those sentiments in engaging Americana attire, a move that softens the blow but rarely cheapens the art.
  2. 70
    Perkins freewheels through American music traditions—Haight-Ashbury folk ('Hey'), New Orleans brass ('Doomsday'), junkyard blues ('I’ll Be Arriving')--with arrangements as rich as a pawn-shop display.
  3. It’ll play huge at the Troubadour. It’s just that, as much orchestration clearly went into this record, it seems content to be merely “well done,” when the opening two tracks make it absolutely, exhilaratingly clear that there’s more than that at stake here.