Evanescence

  • Record Label: Wind-Up
  • Release Date: Oct 11, 2011
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 121 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 97 out of 121
  2. Negative: 9 out of 121
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  1. Oct 11, 2011
    6
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. I think this album is a little weird, it lacks something that I can't really define. When I listened to Evanescence felt like my fuel tank was charging, now it feels just like simple music, as everyone else could do that, and I think there's the flaw, It's very simple. Unlike most of the critics I've heard the album doesn't sound very hard, on the contrary... softer and more like teenager music in the end, specially with "Sleeping Home", board as hell... anyway, it's not crap, but it's halfway the rock it used to be. Expand
  2. Oct 14, 2011
    5
    As a long-time fan of Evanescence, I expected more. Instead, most of the songs sound pretty alike, with only a few exceptions. The album lacks movement and feels more of a step backwards than forwards - like somewhere between 'Fallen' and 'The Open Door'. Lee's vocals are gorgeous as ever, however, and the good songs on the album are solid, though there are none that particularly standAs a long-time fan of Evanescence, I expected more. Instead, most of the songs sound pretty alike, with only a few exceptions. The album lacks movement and feels more of a step backwards than forwards - like somewhere between 'Fallen' and 'The Open Door'. Lee's vocals are gorgeous as ever, however, and the good songs on the album are solid, though there are none that particularly stand head and shoulders above the rest as with their previous offerings; when the bonus tracks could be considered, in my opinion, to be better than many of the album tracks, there's a big problem. It feels a little like the band have stepped back from the melodic drama they're so good at, and it doesn't pay off. Expand
  3. Oct 18, 2012
    6
    After a five-year hiatus, Evanescence have finally returned with their long awaited third-studio effort produced by English five-time Grammy award winning record producer Steve Lillywhite (U2, Morrisey, The Rolling Stones, etc.). And while Evanescence certainly deliver an album full of fan pleasers, it also fails reach outside that fan base by refusing to reach outside the band's foundingAfter a five-year hiatus, Evanescence have finally returned with their long awaited third-studio effort produced by English five-time Grammy award winning record producer Steve Lillywhite (U2, Morrisey, The Rolling Stones, etc.). And while Evanescence certainly deliver an album full of fan pleasers, it also fails reach outside that fan base by refusing to reach outside the band's founding sound and in stead chooses to play it safe. Its opening track, "What You Want", begins with a danceable drumbeat that quickly transforms into an arena-rocking anthem about a failing relationship, ultimately becoming one of the album's most favorable tracks. The most radio-friendly song on the album, "My Heart Is Broken", however, is the most familiar song when it comes to sound, but that's not a cons in this case, thanks to Lee's soaring vocals and dramatic lyrical content. Its "My Immortal"-esque ballad, "Lost In Paradise", will be favored by fans, as well as new listeners, thanks to, again, Lee's vocals and dramatic writing skills. However, the album ultimately fails to appeal through generic alt-metal/nu-metal tracks like "The Other Side", "Sick", and "Never Go Back". Lee has stated that originally, the band wanted to take a more experimental route by exploring more electronic genres, which could maybe saved this album from being forgettable. Expand
  4. Nov 8, 2011
    6
    While Evanescence's sophomore effort Open Door felt more like Amy Lee's experimental solo project accompanied by "chugga-chugga" guitars, Evanescence (claims) to be a heavier record that relies more on organic rock music rather than the electronic rock album Lee intended to make before meeting producer Nick Raskulinecz. The lead single, "What You Want", begins with stadium-shaking drumsWhile Evanescence's sophomore effort Open Door felt more like Amy Lee's experimental solo project accompanied by "chugga-chugga" guitars, Evanescence (claims) to be a heavier record that relies more on organic rock music rather than the electronic rock album Lee intended to make before meeting producer Nick Raskulinecz. The lead single, "What You Want", begins with stadium-shaking drums and Lee's powerful vocals, shouting: "Do what you, what you want!" And while it is certainly catchier than recent rock songs, it lacks the spunk of previous single "Call Me When You're Sober". More tracks that represent the album's rock intentions are "Made of Stone", an alternative metal song that includes Lee's etheral vocals, chunky, churning guitars throughout the verses, and a surprisingly well-thought out guitar solo towards the finale; "The Other Side", a song that relies on heavy metal influences whilst singing about dying and the afterlife. The standout tracks from the album are "The Change", that relies on an electronic feel, beginning with a gentle vibes that transform into typical Evanescence; "My Heart is Broken", the most faithful and seemingly familiar song from the album that contains the strings, piano, guitar riffs and catchy chorus fans adored from the previous albums; "Lost in Paradise", a tear-jerking ballad that begins with Lee's enchanting vocals accompanied by a beautiful piano before transforming quickly into traditional rock-ballad formula that's still beautiful. Overall, Evanescence probably would have been better if it were more explorative and experimental like the band's previous album. Nothing against traditional rock albums, but Evanescence just refuses to reinvent the genre, the band or Lee herself, making it more of a "check this out" than a recommendation. Expand
  5. Aug 27, 2014
    6
    Even in 2014, Evanescence's return in 2011—which came out half of a decade after 2006's The Open Door—disappoints me. To admittedly be one of their most enthusiastic fans for years and years and to love literally everything they've done to date—from their unreleased late-'90s material to their B-sides, Amy Lee and her fellow interchangeable band members made me feel let down. TheEven in 2014, Evanescence's return in 2011—which came out half of a decade after 2006's The Open Door—disappoints me. To admittedly be one of their most enthusiastic fans for years and years and to love literally everything they've done to date—from their unreleased late-'90s material to their B-sides, Amy Lee and her fellow interchangeable band members made me feel let down. The experimental and electronic music influenced album hyped during their work with producer Steve Lillywhite (U2, The Rolling Stones) was cancelled in favor of completely tossing out any refreshing ideas and recording songs that could've been B-sides from their Fallen days. It's the '10s, why do bands continue to try and resurrect nu-metal?

    That's not saying there aren't any redeeming records on here: "My Heart Is Broken" has that signature everything-I-touch-dies sort of melodrama within the musicianship + Lee's knock-out vocals belting out the album's catchiest chorus ("My heart is broken/Sweet sleep, my dark angel"); "Lost in Paradise" is musically My Immortal, Pt. 2, a completely dramatic and chill-inducing rock ballad where Lee apologizes to her fans for being human and wanting more than fame and fortune; "Swimming Home" is gloomy gothtronica at its finest and bonus track "Secret Door" has to be one of Lee's most breathtaking vocal performances in her career of many, many, well, breathtaking vocal performances.

    But all-in-all, nothing's very new. The influences of Bjork, Depeche Mode, and MGMT aren't visible in plain sight due to the forgettable and formulaic 'rock' moments, which sound more like re-written Disturbed or Korn songs rejected from the final cuts of the albums. Amy Lee is the heart and soul of Evanescence. Though her band members try their very best to make a really, really rad rock record, they hold Lee back from exploring her inner ambition she flirted with on her cover of The Nightmare Before Christmas' "Sally's Song" and her recent solo album for the 2014 film War Story. It's not terrible and I'd even recommend it to longtime Evanescence fans, however, it's just not what it could have been.
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Metascore
63

Generally favorable reviews - based on 9 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 9
  2. Negative: 1 out of 9
  1. Nov 8, 2011
    25
    Maniacally narcissistic, Evanescence is corny in the way only music so grim and humorless--and yet irredeemably stupid--can be
  2. Oct 19, 2011
    50
    Evanescence may not be doing anything fresh or positively controversial on this new record all about itself. But they sure know how to keep their diehard fans happy by largely repeating the same formula that worked for them in the past.
  3. Oct 12, 2011
    50
    Too much of the time, Evanescence get lost in the cavernous spaces carved out by their unsecret weapon.