Heaven

Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 33 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 30 out of 33
  2. Negative: 0 out of 33
Buy On
  1. Mojo
    Jun 25, 2012
    40
    No One Ever Sleeps, even with harmonies from Robin Pecknold, feels not magical, but hollow and sluggish. At the rockier end, Heartbreaker adds Arcade Fire urgency and may score alt-radio love. The rest, however, is lukewarm. [Jul 2012, p.83]
  2. Jun 5, 2012
    60
    Heaven isn't 100% bliss, but the Walkmen have taken themselves and their fans one step closer.
  3. Their most consistent and accomplished album to date.
User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 49 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 6
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 6
  3. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. May 29, 2012
    9
    With the last two albums that the Walkmen have put out (including this one) they have become one of the best - not only indie - bands out inWith the last two albums that the Walkmen have put out (including this one) they have become one of the best - not only indie - bands out in the industry. There are a few things that set them apart, and one of the major things being lead vocalist Hamilton Leithauser's very distinctive voice. Over time, Hamilton's voice has changed from an extremely raspy and unpredictable yell, to a more controlled, still raspy, croon which team up so well with the re-verb guitars in this album. Tracks like "Heartbreaker" and the title track "Heaven" exemplify this the best. The Walkmen have always been at their best when they were playing and screaming as loud as they can, and this album has a few songs that show that. However, the opening track "We Can't Be Beat" with Leithauser's croon, and incredible harmonies, and a shift in tempo's in the song really open up a new door for this band. The Walkmen have become better as they mature, not running out of ideas and not afraid to try out a few new things. This album is incredibly beautiful, and will most likely be soundtrack to many summers. Full Review »
  2. Oct 9, 2013
    10
    The best band in the world gets better with age, something I never would have predicted a decade ago when I lovingly clutched that copy ofThe best band in the world gets better with age, something I never would have predicted a decade ago when I lovingly clutched that copy of Bows & Arrows to my chest. It's a long way from "The Rat" to "Heaven" but it's a distance I've travelled myself it's been the soundtrack of my life, and to have connected so resonantly with another band (after The Smiths in my early teens) feels like a blessing I do not deserve in such richness. Full Review »
  3. Jul 13, 2012
    8
    Yet another solid, utterly satisfying record from the Walkmen, dominated once more (in the best sense of the word) by Leithauser's vocals. TheYet another solid, utterly satisfying record from the Walkmen, dominated once more (in the best sense of the word) by Leithauser's vocals. The singer's voice is more tender here than on earlier records, which works especially well on slower songs, such as "Southern Heart" and "Line by Line". Of course, the album still features its fair share of belted-out vocal lines ("We Can't Be Beat", "Heaven"). This is an enjoyable album from start to finish, mixing the band's trademark retro vibe with enough variety to retain the interest of new listeners and Walkmen veterans alike. This album doesn't experiment as much as it capitalizes on a successful formula, which is completely fine by me. Full Review »