Human After All - Daft Punk
Human After All Image
Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 28 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 169 Ratings

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  • Summary: The French electronica duo's third LP is closer in sound to their first than to 2001's 'Discovery.'
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 28
  2. Negative: 4 out of 28
  1. Portraying the state of pop as a series of predictable formulae long since exhausted by corporate superstructure, Human After All more than lives up to its name, rendering a metaphor for failure on the grandest yet simultaneously most personal of terms.
  2. Not as overtly catchy (or cheesy) as Discovery, Human After All nonetheless is a hilariously cold and mechanical work that makes Kraftwerk sound like Curtis Mayfield. [May 2005, p.138]
  3. 70
    The album's most human aspect is its contradictory nature, an ultimate lack of emotion that make the exhilarating Homework and the sentimental Discovery so accessible. [#67, p.90]
  4. 50
    Feels desultory and numb, verging on autistic. [Apr 2005, p.116]
  5. Where the weight of expectation and precedence get to have a say, this feels like not just a failure, but a heartbreaker.
  6. Too much of it is straightforward four-to-the-floor anodynity, and a number of tracks run out of ideas almost immediately, explore touchstones they've caressed more inspiringly before or, worse, do both.
  7. Human After All is determinedly monochromatic aurally, compositionally, and mood-wise. Gosh, they really are robots--the music is flat, barely inflected, sitting there like a vending machine waiting patiently for your quarters.

See all 28 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 55 out of 80
  2. Negative: 11 out of 80
  1. Stafford
    Feb 21, 2007
    10
    This album is a bit of shameful point for me. Rarely do I listen to reviewers, but for some reason or another I did with this one. I think it This album is a bit of shameful point for me. Rarely do I listen to reviewers, but for some reason or another I did with this one. I think it was the universal critial panning of the album that let me to ignore it for so long. For almost a year after it was released I went merrily on my way, driving around late at night with "Discovery" still cemented into my CD player. By some odd stroke of fate though, this began wriggling its way into my life track by track. First one track, then two, and once I was up to three tracks that I really found amazing, I asked myself what the reviewers were blabbering about. So I began listening to it in its entirety. Since then the album has creeped its way into my subconcious. I'll find myself listening to something else and then, without even thinking change it to "Human After All." Certain facets of all those negative reviews are true. It is simpler and darker than "Discovery." But almost all of the negative statements made by the reviewers have ultimately become why I completely have become obsessed with this album. There are few albums in the recent past that I find myself thinking about the day, wishing I was listeing to it. It works on both a "headphone" level as well as purely in the background. I honestly can't put into words why this album has taken a hold of me as it has. But if you go into this not expecting "Discovery Deux" it becomes an extremely addictive and ultimately rewarding album. Whereas "Discovery" was the consolidation of 30 years of dance music into one cohesive brilliant statement, "Human After All" is future music. It's uncomprimising and like nothing you've really heard before. Brilliant in both its simplicity and complexity, the album confounds in the best of ways and presents plac ein music where computers begin to have emotion. Expand
  2. MikeM
    Sep 23, 2005
    10
    I have never heard of daft punk before....but this album is mindblowingly awesome. Dont listen to the so-called critics who seem to be clones I have never heard of daft punk before....but this album is mindblowingly awesome. Dont listen to the so-called critics who seem to be clones of themselves. They are the monotonous robots. Expand
  3. Jul 23, 2013
    9
    When i heard this album for the first time i couldn't believe how bad it was. I felt like daft punk became lazy. Now, after listening to thisWhen i heard this album for the first time i couldn't believe how bad it was. I felt like daft punk became lazy. Now, after listening to this for a few more times, my opinion radically changed and i actually see this as one of the best albums i've ever heard. It's not all good though; take "steam machine" for example. You've heard enough already before the beat kicks in. It's the same with "the brainwasher". But it's the masterpieces that make this album so great. And with masterpieces, i'm talking about song like the title track, "technologic" and "prime time of your life". They've really grown to me now. What i like as well, is that everything sounds so spontaneous. Behind all the robotic effects, it sounds more human than anything i hear on the radio right now.
    They only thing i don't like, is that it's so short. 9 tracks? Come on, i wanted more of this awesomeness!
    Expand
  4. LeonardoF
    Mar 16, 2005
    8
    This is a Rock'n'Roll album made with computers by Robots. The album's title is as ironic as the repetitive, simple songs that This is a Rock'n'Roll album made with computers by Robots. The album's title is as ironic as the repetitive, simple songs that seem to be short of ideas but have a concept behind them and are extremely danceable. "The Brainwasher" is the highlight - a clear party homage to Black Sabbath. This is a record that should be played loud. Expand
  5. JoeM
    Jul 10, 2007
    6
    Whether it's Bangalter's Roule imprint or De-Homem Christo's Crydamoure, Daft Punk's best, most rocking work has been Whether it's Bangalter's Roule imprint or De-Homem Christo's Crydamoure, Daft Punk's best, most rocking work has been generally based on a single gorgeous hook, amped & eq'ed to the max and repeated to punk-rock levels of aural devastation. Unfortunately in this case, with the noble exceptions of the title track, Prime Time, Robot Rock and Television well, the hooks just ain't all that hot. Calm before the storm hopefully. Expand
  6. ZachH
    Mar 14, 2005
    5
    It's true that it is a lot like Homework was. A very disappointing record that lacks a great deal of distinguishing content.
  7. JackC
    Oct 9, 2006
    0
    Augh, it's terrible. Daft Punk set a pretty high standard with their previous two albums... and then to be treated to plodding, Augh, it's terrible. Daft Punk set a pretty high standard with their previous two albums... and then to be treated to plodding, unmelodic messes like Technologic, Prime Time of Your Life, and Television Rules The Nation... I feel like Daft Punk is laughing at me and everyone else who bought this record. Every song is just a repetitive mess that I could have put together in 3 minutes with Protools, and feels especially shoddy given the fact that Daft Punk had years to work on this thing. Instead, they spent 6 weeks on it... and it shows. Expand

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