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Human After All Image
Metascore
57

Mixed or average reviews - based on 28 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 206 Ratings

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  • Summary: The French electronica duo's third LP is closer in sound to their first than to 2001's 'Discovery.'

Top Track

Technologic
Buy it, use it, break it, fix it, trash it, change it, mail, upgrade it Charge it, point it, zoom it, press it, snap it, work it, quick erase... See the rest of the song lyrics
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 28
  2. Negative: 4 out of 28
  1. Portraying the state of pop as a series of predictable formulae long since exhausted by corporate superstructure, Human After All more than lives up to its name, rendering a metaphor for failure on the grandest yet simultaneously most personal of terms.
  2. Alternative Press
    80
    Not as overtly catchy (or cheesy) as Discovery, Human After All nonetheless is a hilariously cold and mechanical work that makes Kraftwerk sound like Curtis Mayfield. [May 2005, p.138]
  3. Magnet
    70
    The album's most human aspect is its contradictory nature, an ultimate lack of emotion that make the exhilarating Homework and the sentimental Discovery so accessible. [#67, p.90]
  4. Daft Punk may have become the victim of their own animatronic satire.
  5. Where the weight of expectation and precedence get to have a say, this feels like not just a failure, but a heartbreaker.
  6. Too much of it is straightforward four-to-the-floor anodynity, and a number of tracks run out of ideas almost immediately, explore touchstones they've caressed more inspiringly before or, worse, do both.
  7. Under The Radar
    30
    The snarky, ironic title only seems to poke fun at what is Daft Punk's most programmed and artificial album to date, and this is just a part of what feels like an all in-joke record. [#9]

See all 28 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 85
  2. Negative: 11 out of 85
  1. DhirenM
    Mar 15, 2005
    10
    Great album-maybe because im a huge fan but its what i wanted to here
  2. JayA
    Oct 3, 2005
    10
    Daft Punk delivers yet again with a stylus of music that can both recede into your background subconscious and at the same moment push itself Daft Punk delivers yet again with a stylus of music that can both recede into your background subconscious and at the same moment push itself forward until it is all that fills your head, blasting its technatronic melody into your unprotected face. It's ironic humor and robotically produced structure is as enjoyable as it is intriguing. If computers could make music, it would be Daft Punk. Expand
  3. Stafford
    Feb 21, 2007
    10
    This album is a bit of shameful point for me. Rarely do I listen to reviewers, but for some reason or another I did with this one. I think it This album is a bit of shameful point for me. Rarely do I listen to reviewers, but for some reason or another I did with this one. I think it was the universal critial panning of the album that let me to ignore it for so long. For almost a year after it was released I went merrily on my way, driving around late at night with "Discovery" still cemented into my CD player. By some odd stroke of fate though, this began wriggling its way into my life track by track. First one track, then two, and once I was up to three tracks that I really found amazing, I asked myself what the reviewers were blabbering about. So I began listening to it in its entirety. Since then the album has creeped its way into my subconcious. I'll find myself listening to something else and then, without even thinking change it to "Human After All." Certain facets of all those negative reviews are true. It is simpler and darker than "Discovery." But almost all of the negative statements made by the reviewers have ultimately become why I completely have become obsessed with this album. There are few albums in the recent past that I find myself thinking about the day, wishing I was listeing to it. It works on both a "headphone" level as well as purely in the background. I honestly can't put into words why this album has taken a hold of me as it has. But if you go into this not expecting "Discovery Deux" it becomes an extremely addictive and ultimately rewarding album. Whereas "Discovery" was the consolidation of 30 years of dance music into one cohesive brilliant statement, "Human After All" is future music. It's uncomprimising and like nothing you've really heard before. Brilliant in both its simplicity and complexity, the album confounds in the best of ways and presents plac ein music where computers begin to have emotion. Expand
  4. JoelJ
    Mar 15, 2005
    8
    For me, this album is musically the electronic equivalent of Nirvana's "Bleach". It is the cultural significance of the album that makes For me, this album is musically the electronic equivalent of Nirvana's "Bleach". It is the cultural significance of the album that makes it. The Daft Punks want to get a message across, an ambition they are harbouring for the first time, I'd suggest: the magic of pop is dying at the hands of television. I think they're right. We've gone in forty years from Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds to annual TV talent shows and software which evaluates the likely hit potential of a new song based on, essentially, it's mundanity. Discovery and Interstella5555 were detailed, technicolour and totally synthetic. I would have loved to hear and watch more of the same with this album, and I hope that DP will get back to it eventually, but... it seems that right now Daft Punk would rather beat 'em than join 'em, and if the only other option is following the Green Day path of "simplify, homogenise, capture the Christian Rock market if you can", then go for it. Expand
  5. Feb 7, 2014
    6
    In all its metallic, cold, crunchiness, Human After All, which was considered to be one of the most anticipated, yet disappointing albums ofIn all its metallic, cold, crunchiness, Human After All, which was considered to be one of the most anticipated, yet disappointing albums of 2005 and in the EDM community overall, there's meaning -- or should I say purpose -- to be found here. Now it's almost been a decade since its release, and Daft Punk have since produced for the 2010 Walt Disney film Tron: Legacy and made one of the most memorable, critically acclaimed of 2010s thus far, Random Access Memories. And maybe because of that, time has been moderately kinder to this electronic "dud". After all, Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homen-Christo -- calling them by name since I'm an adoring fan myself -- intended for the album to have a robotic perception of what "being human" means. It's virtually devoid of any lyrics (aside from the often grating repetition of the song's names, respectively), so we're left with the music. And the results are hit-or-miss. "The Brainwasher" and "Technologic" are probably the somewhat most enjoyable of the bunch, matching its repetitive vodocers with some catchy techno that can easily be described in one word: "earworm". And the worst being "Robot Rock", one of Daft Punk's laziest use of sampling to date and a poor sequel to "Aerodynamic". However, one treasure (or at least by this album's standards) exists: "Make Love", an appealing, soothing throwback to their Discovery days; it's the album's "breather". So all-in-all, it's not by any means a very good album and it's justifiable for whomever finds it quite the opposite. For any Daft Punk fan, they've learned to at least commend its existence. Daft Punk are "Human After All" -- totally called for -- they're inclined to make flaws. Even robots do that every now and then. Expand
  6. Oct 3, 2013
    5
    Despite the clear goal of the album, it fails to hit the same chord Homework and Discovery were able to do. Overly repetitive, overly-samplingDespite the clear goal of the album, it fails to hit the same chord Homework and Discovery were able to do. Overly repetitive, overly-sampling on Robot Rock (Breakwater-Release The Beast), and a rather boring album. The album may be a hit at dance clubs, but listening to this by yourself will bore you. Expand
  7. JackC
    Oct 9, 2006
    0
    Augh, it's terrible. Daft Punk set a pretty high standard with their previous two albums... and then to be treated to plodding, Augh, it's terrible. Daft Punk set a pretty high standard with their previous two albums... and then to be treated to plodding, unmelodic messes like Technologic, Prime Time of Your Life, and Television Rules The Nation... I feel like Daft Punk is laughing at me and everyone else who bought this record. Every song is just a repetitive mess that I could have put together in 3 minutes with Protools, and feels especially shoddy given the fact that Daft Punk had years to work on this thing. Instead, they spent 6 weeks on it... and it shows. Expand

See all 85 User Reviews