In The Vines Image
Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: This is the third album for the San Diego-based band led by Ray Raposa.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. In the Vines is a spare, unhurried blend of raw instrumentation and experimental electronic noisemaking serving as a chronicle of crippling depression and death's imminent domain.
  2. By taking more time on this record, Raposa has delivered with not only a return to form, but perhaps his best offering yet.
  3. Ray Raposa's creepy folk explorations as Castanets remain intimate affairs writ in miniature, despite a backing band with up to seven members and a choir of 10.
  4. It’s no laugh-a-minute ride, but there’s a beauty in Raposa’s misery that’ll appeal to acolytes of Will Oldham and his aforementioned collaborators alike.
  5. 70
    A very dark album, yes, but Raposa's ability to convey much with little usually results in a fragile and gloomy beauty rather than mopey dreck.
  6. With ten songs running under forty minutes, the haphazard track order (with production quality going from super lo-fi to pristine) and dour feel ultimately make for a rather challenging listen.
  7. It's often bleak fare, but it's also compulsive stuff. [Jan 2008, p.105]

See all 20 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Rev.Rikard
    Nov 10, 2007
    6
    If I did not know better I would think an admirer of Bob Dylan had written a dark country/folk album laden with equally dark lyrical images. If I did not know better I would think an admirer of Bob Dylan had written a dark country/folk album laden with equally dark lyrical images. The melodies will not hook you on this album. The listener needs to be a lover of poetry and dark prose. Too many of the tunes sound familiar, though the content of each merits a thorough hearing. Expand