• Record Label: Mute
  • Release Date: Apr 1, 2008
User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 23 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 23
  2. Negative: 2 out of 23

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  1. May 13, 2012
    8
    I'm not crazy for dance music or eletronica, but I really like Moby's music for some reason. Even loved the Hotel album and how they used a song from that album for The Devil Wears Prada movie. Maybe it's because he's a vegetarian that I like him! Anyway, this one is a keeper for me.
  2. CaseyE
    Apr 12, 2008
    9
    This is easily in his top 3 probably behind Everything is Wrong & Play. This is a real return to form for Mr. Melville, a great mix of old and new, with all that Moby charm. His last couple of albums were trash i felt but I am really loving this. Instead of trying to recreate Play you can tell he's got his musical soul back.
  3. RickR.
    Apr 7, 2008
    9
    I agree almost completely with Julian L.'s review. Nicely said. "Last Night" oozes with a club/disco/retro feel. I love how the album shifts in tone from the full throttle energy of the beginning of a night out clubbing to the slow, quiet, sedate songs that close out the album (as the night winds down). Personally, after the initial awesome "Ooh Yeah" cut, I find tracks 2-4 kind of I agree almost completely with Julian L.'s review. Nicely said. "Last Night" oozes with a club/disco/retro feel. I love how the album shifts in tone from the full throttle energy of the beginning of a night out clubbing to the slow, quiet, sedate songs that close out the album (as the night winds down). Personally, after the initial awesome "Ooh Yeah" cut, I find tracks 2-4 kind of weak. The album then kicks back in with track 5, and from then on it's a near perfect album. "Alice" and "Hyenas" are standouts, as are "Disco Lies" and "Stars." I also love how Moby channels Tangerine Dream in "Sweet Apocalypse." The quiet "Mothers Of The Night" and reflective "Last Night" round out this solid album. Nicely done, Moby! Expand
  4. NeilL.
    Apr 7, 2008
    9
    This album has grown on me really fast. I liked it from the get-go but now I am spinning it frequently. This is one of Moby's best albums to date. It features the kind of free spirit I wish he exhibited with all of his material. These songs are really easy to just chill to: to relax. And right now, that's exactly what I needed.
  5. JulianL.
    Apr 3, 2008
    9
    A hysterically funny and happy album, while some of the songs initially made me cringe, they are so disgustingly corny, ultimately they are cleverly crafted hooks which reel you in. Towards the end of the album it becmes so sweet it literally makes you wanna puke, but like with most sugars give it a few minutes and you are dying to go back to it. I suspect we'll be hearing a lot ofA hysterically funny and happy album, while some of the songs initially made me cringe, they are so disgustingly corny, ultimately they are cleverly crafted hooks which reel you in. Towards the end of the album it becmes so sweet it literally makes you wanna puke, but like with most sugars give it a few minutes and you are dying to go back to it. I suspect we'll be hearing a lot of this album this summer. Expand
  6. FelipeP.
    Apr 2, 2008
    10
    His best album since "Play." Fantastic electronic old school.
Metascore
63

Generally favorable reviews - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 21
  2. Negative: 1 out of 21
  1. 50
    He lacks [Daft Punk and Justice's] wit or personality, and the album turns into a sucession of flashy vocal cameos and samples. [Apr 2008, p.81]
  2. A concept album about an all-night bender, Last Night solidifies Moby's link in the chain that binds DJ pioneers like Todd Terry to slinky futurists like Justice.
  3. Uncut
    40
    This finds Richard Melville Hall seemingly going through the motions. [Mar 2008, p.96]