Latin

  • Record Label: XL
  • Release Date: May 11, 2010
Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 17 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 17
  2. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. For Holy Fuck, Latin is a monumental step forward. By trimming back the choppy art-house disjointedness and quirky Casio tones, the band has successfully evolved their sound into something much more provocative, heavy duty, and rewarding.
  2. Latin doesn't have a weak moment, and while LP's higher energy levels may indeed play better with that lucrative Top Shop demographic, it would seem remarkable if any right thinking fan of the band didn't think Latin at least its equal.
  3. It won't be to everyone's tastes and it's clear with a name like theirs they won't be appearing on Fearne Cotton's playlist anytime soon, but there's an energy and vitality to Latin that's impossible to deny.
  4. Latin, the band's third album, is something of a side-step from its predecessors, Holy Fuck (2004) and LP (2007). It's less brawny and statelier, perhaps in part due to its producers Paul Epworth (Florence, The Rapture) and Dave Sardy (Black Mountain, LCD). But it might well be the closest the band has got to sounding as visceral and as rich on record as they do live.
  5. Still in place is their frenetic rushes of sonic trickery, but most notably the band have relaxed a little and even got a little funky.
  6. The result is an absolute monster of a closing track that caps a seductively repeatable album, which speaks miles to the effort on Holy Fuck's strongest album to date.
  7. Q Magazine
    80
    Latin, their third album, turbo-charges post-punk, lolloping Karutrock and primitive electro.
  8. Holy Fuck have carved out a unique and identifiable sound of their own, and as the band itself has solidified, it's made their identity even stronger.
  9. Filter
    76
    While not as in-your-face or sinister as the last LPs, Latin packs a punch nevertheless. [Spring/Summer 2010, p.107]
  10. While nothing here is as jaw-dropping as the breakout 2007 single "Lovely Allen," there are plenty of grin-worthy moments--though they're often paired with material that's frustratingly derivative.
  11. The Toronto-based collective goes all out on its third album, Latin, which features lead members Brian Borcherdt and Graham Walsh's spacey keyboards and effects supplemented by the powerful live drums and bass of their touring personnel.
  12. The sheer scope of 'Latin', however, is what rescues it from feeling like a box-ticking completion of a mission--as 'P.I.G.S.' races off into the distance after its lull, there's the feeling that there might still be more to see, more work to be done.
  13. The Wire
    70
    There are signs of eclectism creeping in, but these are balanced by the group's tendency to consolidate its progression with a rearguard action of sheer brute force. [Jul 2010, p.56]
  14. It's a great album to trance out to, but not as memorable as we'd hoped.
  15. Is it jaw dropping? Worthy of actually muttering the words "holy fuck" in earnest? Nah. Well, maybe the drumming at times. But at the very least, it's worthy of a few shits and giggles.
  16. Uncut
    60
    It's all a very respectable, and closer "P.I.G.S" is great, just slightly disappointing if one had hoped for more than acceptable continuity soundtracks. [Jun 2010, p.90]
  17. The production leaves Latin a bit flat at times, and not every song is as memorable as a good pop-rock song needs to be. It's nice to see the group moving in a new direction, but for a band with such a confrontational name it's disappointing how little passion they inspire.

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