Metascore
69

Generally favorable reviews - based on 27 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 27
  2. Negative: 1 out of 27
  1. May 2, 2012
    70
    By placing so much emphasis on the stylish ever-shifting surfaces of its production, Little Broken Hearts never quite sinks in emotionally. Norah Jones may be pouring her heart out but it's been given an elegantly detailed sculpture that camouflages her pain.
  2. 80
    She hasn't sounded quite so free and engaged as she does on these songs, where her vocal and lyrical mannerisms come through more forcefully and confidently.
  3. Jul 12, 2012
    78
    Jones takes a gothic turn with "Miriam," a soaring, surreal account of a romantic rival's murder. Like so much of ... Little Broken Hearts, it kills.
  4. Apr 19, 2012
    70
    She keeps the mood fairly moderate amongst Burton's fluid soundtrack, setting the pace with a wry bravado that makes this album a dynamic listen.
  5. Apr 30, 2012
    80
    This is a striking changeup.
  6. Apr 30, 2012
    75
    Not everything works. The closing "All a Dream" is a six-minute drag back to sleepy-time Norah. But mostly, Jones plays her part in this career left-turn with chilled and sometimes chilling resolve.
  7. 70
    This is a serious indie pop album. Jones and Burton have created something that should fit in the record collection of any Feist-loving indie kid just as easily as that of those soccer moms she won over years ago.
  8. 75
    With Brian Burton (a.k.a. Danger Mouse) producing, the heavy-lidded-vixen thing works for her here.
  9. May 1, 2012
    80
    This Norah Jones is damaged, dangerous and vulnerable, and Burton's mastery of sound helps deepen the relationship between listener and song.
  10. May 7, 2012
    74
    With Jones these days, you may not know exactly what you're getting, but you know it's going to be great.
  11. Apr 20, 2012
    60
    An intriguing partnership that fails to entirely live up to expectations. [May 2012, p.86]
  12. May 1, 2012
    80
    There is a lot at play here, both sonically and lyrically, and the album rewards repeated listens. Most importantly, Little Broken Hearts is an album that just works.
  13. May 3, 2012
    60
    Little Broken Hearts is held back by a lack of intimacy and the unemotional stiffness we associate with Jones. Still, it's almost a great album.
  14. May 9, 2012
    81
    Between the obvious hits and the Halcion fuzz however lays an interesting sound.
  15. May 1, 2012
    70
    The entire album plays like a cohesive whole, somehow frayed and fragmented if not left intact.
  16. Jun 20, 2012
    20
    It's one boringly pedestrian plod after another. [Jun 2012, p.104]
  17. May 1, 2012
    70
    Her fifth album is a brand-rejigging songwriting collab with Brian "Danger Mouse" Burton that both picks up her pace and pumps up her palette.
  18. Apr 30, 2012
    70
    By revealing some carefully chosen, deeply personal details and by building elaborate fa├žades for the sake of drama, Jones has crafted her headiest, most complex album to date.
  19. May 1, 2012
    80
    Little Broken Hearts is exciting because it explores the darkest corners of betrayal, bad love, and jealousy with enough vitality to propel Jones out of the bloodless purgatory of brunch music.
  20. May 15, 2012
    58
    Jones is good at what she does, but it never feels like something she burns to do.
  21. May 1, 2012
    60
    Little Broken Hearts finds an effective way to grab the listener by the lapels: with kid gloves.
  22. 80
    There's always an ingenious, often unexpected, connection linking the music to the mood of a specific song.
  23. It's exquisite, of course, but dull.
  24. Apr 30, 2012
    60
    Mostly, though, Little Broken Hearts finds an effective way to grab the listener by the lapels: with kid gloves.
  25. Apr 27, 2012
    80
    In the past decade, it seems Jones has made a sneaky transition from dinner party backdrop to David Lynch soundtrack.
  26. Apr 20, 2012
    70
    This is a bold and engaging revolution. [May 2012, p.75]
  27. May 21, 2012
    40
    Danger Mouse's presence-and underperformance-on Little Broken Hearts turns what might otherwise just be another safe but bullshit-free Norah Jones album into an especially underwhelming affair.
User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 45 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 12
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 12
  3. Negative: 0 out of 12
  1. Jul 7, 2013
    10
    I am a male who strongly favors music with a beautiful female voice. As such, I have always liked Norah Jones singing. But with the album, "Little Broken Hearts." I have reached a totally new appreciation for her. It crept up on me. I liked "She's 22" right off because it hit real close to home. You hear a woman, still obviously in love, ask her ex forlornly whether the 22 year old he's now with "does she make you happy." Norah used to put her mouth close to the microphone and let her beautiful voice be heard with fairly standard musical accompaniment. With this album, she allows her voice to be the lead instrument in wonderfully stylized songs with a new mix of electronic music, cello, and steel guitar, all of which establish the mood for each song. "Take It Back" is a wonderful example of this new Norah Jones as her voice melds with a melody but does not dominate by any means. "Miriam" tells the story of a woman wronged and the lyrics haunted me from the first listening. Long after falling in love with this song, I found the video on YouTube. It is nothing short of Music Video Art. I hope Norah Jones continues to follow this new career path. Full Review »
  2. Nov 9, 2012
    10
    Norah has changed her sound in just the slightest, and it's only noticeable in a few songs, but it's refreshing. She realized maybe she need to surprise people, and I think she will. Little Broken Hearts is a different kind of masterpiece. Full Review »
  3. Nov 4, 2012
    8
    Corações partidos sempre rendem grandes músicas e ás vezes grandes álbuns. Dou dois exemplos apenas: Jagged Little Pill da Alanis e 21 da Adele. Esses dois são apenas dois mais recentes que eu lembrei assim de bate e pronto. Agora nesse mesmo hall podemos citar a cantora Norah Jones com o lançamento do seu quarto álbum Little Broken Hearts. Porém, o resultado é mais que apenas um álbum sobre um coração partido. É um álbum sobre uma cantora encontrando sua maturidade artística.

    A dona de Don't Know Why traz á tona uma nova sonoridade para seu "piano/jazz": algo meio eletrônico/indie pop com uma alma sombria e bittersweet. O coração partido de Norah se mostra nas belas composições que permeiam todo álbum. Mantendo o estilo minimalista que a fez famosa só que agora com um peso libertador nas costas. Ao que parece a decepção amorosa fez com que ele se abrisse como compositora e a deixou liberar seus sentimentos mais obscuros como ciúmes, raiva e pessimismo com a vida de uma forma geral. A sonoridade de Norah está completamente diferente. Em busca de algo que a melhor em sua nova fase, ela explorou um som mais alternativo ao deixar uma pegada mais indie eletropop a contaminasse. A emoção vem de forma mais difícil. Você não viajar de primeira nas canções de Little Broken Hearts. Diferente das melodias aconchegantes, aqui ela faz seu ouvinte deitar em um colchão mais duro que demorar até acertar o "prumo" da coluna. Mesmo mantendo a delicada voz, os efeitos que acompanham os vocais de Norah têm a função de deixar mais estéril e distante a voz dela como uma quase espectadora da própria tristeza. Adora a dor imprensa em She's 22 onde Norah fala abertamente em ser traída. A bela Good Morning, que abre o álbum, tem uma produção instrumental belíssima. Little Broken Hearts tem algo de trilha para filme de David Lynch que assusta e cativa ainda mais que é a melhor composição do álbum. E por fim no topo do álbum está Happy Pills (resenha a seguir), mesmo um pouco deslocada no álbum, é impressionante. Depois de tudo isso só me resta a dizer: Norah Jones, muito bem vinda ao hall dos (pequenos) corações quebrados.
    Full Review »