Metascore
87

Universal acclaim - based on 46 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 46
  2. Negative: 0 out of 46
  1. Feb 6, 2013
    60
    It’s a good album, but not a great one, and though the long tail of history will eventually render such a long production time moot, it’s certainly not a record justifying the ludicrous wait.
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 149 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 27
  2. Negative: 2 out of 27
  1. Feb 8, 2013
    10
    devastatingly good, and nearly miraculous given the fact that this album had 22 years of hype behind it. i agree with some reviewer who saiddevastatingly good, and nearly miraculous given the fact that this album had 22 years of hype behind it. i agree with some reviewer who said it's a third part opera old school mbv, new material, antidote i would actually simplify it guitars, synthesizers, percussion. the music is dynamic, some songs are forceful and ferocious, others are smooth, gentle, romantic, they all intertwine, they build on one another. it's a welcome resurgence of the beauty of the electric guitar, and a clear pointer towards new directions the band hopefully continues to follow. ace. Full Review »
  2. Feb 7, 2013
    10
    I am only 17, but when I was 11 and only beginning to dip my toes into alt rock, I discovered 2 albums made in 1991. Both unimaginablyI am only 17, but when I was 11 and only beginning to dip my toes into alt rock, I discovered 2 albums made in 1991. Both unimaginably brilliant, they changed my life. The one, the insanely popular and seminal Nevermind from Nirvana, the other an album whose stature grew from virtually nonexistant to being nearly as, and arguably even more, influential than Nevermind. The latter, was ofcourse Loveless. I was so confounded by its innovations and inventiveness and the harsh formless beauty of the songs, so much so that I scoured the Earth in search of albums that sound similar. Guess how that went.

    I may have not had to wait 22 years like other fans, but I sort of grew comfortable with the idea that MBV would never release another album. Then the reunion happened. Rumours flew around about new songs, a possible album even. I shrugged it off. I did my research. These kinds of rumours go around every couple of years. But then the rumours started gaining momentum. I didn't want to get heartbroken, so i didn't want to pay attention, but really, I was as excited as a prepubescent girl who saw Justin Bieber. But I didn't really believe it. They said they mastered it on Facebook on the last Mayan calendar day. I still didn't believe it. In fact, I still don't. It all seems so surreal, which is extremely apt, because so does the music.

    When I downloaded m b v, I was hesitant to press play. What if it didn't live up to the massive, massive expectations? Then i played it. The first third sounded like Loveless outtakes that shouldn't have been taken out. Woozy, loud, spiralling guitars and ambiguous vocals all there, and had the rest of the album been like that, it would've been amazing too. I mean, it's been 22 years and still nobody's come close to successfully reproducing Loveless. But that isn't how MBV play it. Instead, where Loveless was driven by relentless instrumental innovation, most of m b v is driven by strong songwriting, and supplimented by the still-all-these-years-later innovative production.

    All in all this album is as beautiful and affecting a masterpiece as it should be, even if it hasn't usurped Loveless's position as the greatest shoegazing masterpiece ever. A well deserved 10/10
    Full Review »
  3. Feb 6, 2013
    9
    22 years after making the seminal shoegaze album of the 1990's, no band came close to achieving the level of success with droning guitars and22 years after making the seminal shoegaze album of the 1990's, no band came close to achieving the level of success with droning guitars and faded vocals, as My Bloody Valentine had. That is, until MBV. While it certainly is a step down from Loveless in terms of perfection, and is less erratically creative then the 1988 precursor Isn't Anything, MBV is still a step above all guitar rock today, because of the sound My Bloody Valentine has alone perfected. Whether it proves to be as timeless as it's predecessors may take another quarter century to determine, but surely this is a magnificent return, made by one of the most reclusive bands of all time. Full Review »