Melophobia

  • Record Label: RCA
  • Release Date: Oct 8, 2013
User Score
8.6

Universal acclaim- based on 61 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 57 out of 61
  2. Negative: 3 out of 61

Review this album

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Nov 19, 2013
    5
    Cage the Elephant's self-titled album back in 2008 was a game-changer. It filled some grungy, punkish hole that had been left vacant since I stopped listening to Green Day in Jr. high, and filled it with head-thrashing, gain-filled songs like In One Ear and Ain't No Rest For The Wicked. Thank You Happy Birthday's release with songs like Shake Me Down felt like a compromise of thatCage the Elephant's self-titled album back in 2008 was a game-changer. It filled some grungy, punkish hole that had been left vacant since I stopped listening to Green Day in Jr. high, and filled it with head-thrashing, gain-filled songs like In One Ear and Ain't No Rest For The Wicked. Thank You Happy Birthday's release with songs like Shake Me Down felt like a compromise of that original sound, and Melophobia is in the same vein. Tracks like Come a Little Closer or Teeth pull you into the album, in search of more high-energy sing alongs, but the album ultimately offers disappointment at every other turn. The tracks in Melophobia are decent compositions in their own right, but the memory of 2008's James Brown makes me wonder if CtE hasn't lived up to their potential. Expand
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 13
  2. Negative: 1 out of 13
  1. Feb 14, 2014
    80
    Their [stardom] has been a slow rise. The ascent continues apace. [Mar 2014, p.108]
  2. Feb 6, 2014
    70
    The result is a compelling exercise in growth.
  3. Feb 3, 2014
    80
    While the familiar swagger is present and correct both in the Bowie-influenced "Spiderhead" and the crackling "It's Just Forever," these moments are leavened by quieter, more reflective tracks such as "Hypocrite." [Mar 2014, p.72]