Minor Love

Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 16 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 16
  2. Negative: 0 out of 16
  1. Though there's a nice sense of humor throughout, there's just not enough meat on the bone to inspire any sort of real investment in the majority of these songs.
  2. 60
    Minor Love still packs some Jonathan Richman–esque quirk, as Green croons in a Lou Reed deadpan about goblins, flatulence, and other concerns over solidly constructed lo-fi tunes.
  3. His style, somewhere between Leonard Cohen and The Velvet Underground, offers little in terms of originality, and often the sappy and stoically emotional quality of the lyrics comes off as snarky.
  4. Uncut
    60
    Musically it's toytown folk, like Jonathan Richman with out the complicated buts, but Green's narrative lyrics grow increasingly weird and witty, recalling early '70s Lou Reed. [Feb 2010, p.86]
  5. Mojo
    40
    Green can turn on the charm--countrified finale Blacken My Stay and Castles And Tassles are winners, and "castles and tassles and fatulent assholes" is a hysterical refrain - but overall, Minor Love is a curiously enervating affair. [Feb 2010, p. 95]
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 6 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Jan 12, 2016
    6
    Very clever lyrics catchy tunes pretty much what someone would expect from an artist as profound as adam green. However, the songs get old atVery clever lyrics catchy tunes pretty much what someone would expect from an artist as profound as adam green. However, the songs get old at some point and i have this experience from previous records of his that's why i'm holding myself back not to listen to the songs repeatedly Full Review »
  2. Jan 6, 2011
    10
    This album is criminally underrated. Almost every song on Minor Love is a gem. Adam Green has matured both emotionally and musically withThis album is criminally underrated. Almost every song on Minor Love is a gem. Adam Green has matured both emotionally and musically with this album, and after a bunch of releases in recent years that didn't live up to his early work, critics failed to notice he's suddenly put out one of the greatest records of 2010. There is unmistakable newfound depth & sincerity enshrouded in these songs, which can easily be overlooked by a critic who is too lazy to look beneath the irony that adam has been known for. It is perhaps that uncomfortable juxtaposition of hyper-nonsense with hyper-sincerity that makes this so touching. Not to mention, these songs are short and catchy-as-hell with melodies and arrangements that aren't obvious. There is nothing trendy or too earth-shatteringly original about this album, and there doesn't need to be-- these songs stand on their own. Full Review »