Mojo

Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
  1. The playing is solid, but one wishes Petty & the Heartbreakers had simply covered some of those old Chess classics rather than trying half-heartedly to write their own -- it would have made for an album closer to intent.
  2. Mojo sees Petty steep himself in Americana again, adopt a live-in-the-studio feel, and generally rock out. The results are initially quite perky, as the band crash and charge through songs, but after a couple of plays everything becomes rather dull.
  3. Petty’s classic pop knack, breezy melodies and laid-back drawl take a back seat to Campbell’s meandering, jammy solos and the album’s overwhelmingly old-guy-blues sound.
  4. The record is long on instrumentals and short on singing, with Petty showing up mostly to fill space between guitar solos and extended jams, giving Mojo a higher Heartbreakers-to-Petty ratio than any previous release. But if Mojo is meant to be the band's showcase, it's not an especially successful one.
  5. And in Don't Pull Me Over – a plea to a police officer for clemency over marijuana possession, set to an Eric Claptonesque vision of reggae – Petty may have written the worst song ever.
  6. Uncut
    60
    Unfortunately, and rather ironically, Mojo is ultimately undone by the very virtuosity of its creators: the band stumbles repeatedly into that musican's trap of making music that sounds intended principally to impress other musicans. [July 2010, p.102]
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 26 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. CodyT.
    Jun 17, 2010
    6
    A great return for the Heartbreakers. But far from perfect. This album, while a little too long and bloated, does have redeeming qualities A great return for the Heartbreakers. But far from perfect. This album, while a little too long and bloated, does have redeeming qualities though. Styles range from Zeppelin-esque rock (I Should Have Known It) to honky tonk (Jefferson Jericho Blues) to reggae (Don't Pull Me Over). When Petty and his band DO bring home the bacon and fry it in the pan, its well worth the purchase. Full Review »
  2. LeoT
    Jun 17, 2010
    10
    WOW! These guys never disappoint. highly recommended.
  3. AndyB
    Jun 16, 2010
    10
    Possibly the most honest blues album i've heard in a very long time. The honesty that presents itself in every track is incredible.