More Light - J. Mascis & the Fog
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 0 out of 12
  1. Buoyed by the lethargy embodied in his laconic vocal delivery and tossed-off solos-- the qualities that distinguished Mascis as the godfather of slacker rock-- this album sounds nothing short of triumphant. Which is funny, because aside from sounding the most excited and invigorated he has in years, J Mascis does little different on More Light.
  2. There are moments on this album when you remember Nirvana used to open for J Mascis' old band, Dinosaur Jr. There are many such moments, gloriously ragged snatches of rock.
  3. Hard, reverb-heavy, yet fluent guitar arabesques topped by husky, yearning, sorely troubled vocals. [Nov 2000, p.110]
  4. 80
    The solo J. has all the heartfelt keening of Where You Been-era Dinosaur, but with a fresh approach to his trademark blending of powerchords and melodies.
  5. The irony, of course, is that More Light is a perfect fit within the Dinosaur Jr catalog and, in fact, would rank as one of its better entries, a spirited, 11-song outing on which Mascis' writing and performing sound fresher and more muscular than they have in years, certainly since the early end of the '90s.
  6. This supposed solo album sounds exactly like Dinosaur Jr... It's a formula that can still thrill... but Mascis hs been doing this for well over a decade, and Light doesn't come close to Dinosaur classics like You're Living All Over Me. [10/27/2000, p.2000]
  7. 70
    The good thing with Mascis is that, even without straying in the least from his recognizable sound, he can maintain some degree of unpredictability in his songs.
  8. The disc is loud, unfailingly melodic, and pretty laid-back.... Whether More Light will prove strong enough to once again set the tone of indie music, let alone contemporary guitar-rock, is another question entirely, though it's no doubt the last one on Mascis' mind. As usual, he sounds more concerned with unfashionable navel-gazing rock than earth-changing works of mass cultural importance and emotional resonance...
  9. 60
    It's no great leap forward. [Nov. 2000, p.117]
  10. The sameyness is still there, granted, but like [Neil] Young, his spiritual godfather, Mascis has a way of making his ramshackle melodies are downright endearing, and if you're a kindhearted soul, that'll allow you to forgive the half-assed stuff.
  11. More Light... burns with a raw intensity, albeit sandwiched between moments that recall Mascis' acoustic and goofy backwoods major-label work. [Jan 2001, p.94]
  12. More Light is, on the whole, more of what made him great--songs with airhead titles like "Where'd You Go," which stretch glorious guitar solos over solid chopping riffs--but it's packed with too much filler. [#200, p.80]

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