Metascore
87

Universal acclaim - based on 11 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 11
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 11
  3. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. The set might get a little long in the tooth, even in its individual parts, but on both parts Shackleton is treading fresh ground in a whole different solar system than the rest of dance music and all its various eccentrics.
  2. Jun 6, 2012
    86
    Everything that makes Shackleton's sound a singular one is on proud display through this extensive compilation of new material.
  3. 90
    Continuing to mystify audiences with ethereal, oft-experimental electronic music, Shackleton delivers one of the finest jewels of 2012.
  4. Jun 21, 2012
    80
    Shackleton, if there was any doubt, can do big picture and tight focus equally well; he can lead us into the future musically while digging in his heels against the one that's actually in store.
  5. 80
    It's not without faults, but overall it's a undoubtedly a very welcome gift.
  6. Dec 10, 2012
    100
    It's a brilliant exploration of the inevitable interaction between sound, the passing of time and the active process of listening.
  7. Jun 21, 2012
    80
    Drawbar Organ / Quiet Hour takes that fascination [with dub] and grinds it in the back molars, spitting out something lumpy, infirm, and wonderfully transformed.
  8. Jun 6, 2012
    90
    There's so much blood and soul poured into Music for the Quiet Hour that it almost feels effortless. Along with the fascinatingly fragmented Drawbar Organ EPs, the box set presents what's either a closing chapter or a new beginning in the career of one of electronic music's most luminous illuminati.
  9. Jun 6, 2012
    80
    The overall impression is of a lamp shone directly into the darkened corners of Shackleton's music, casting all its hidden detail in sharp relief.
  10. Jul 24, 2012
    80
    Ultimately, these elements mostly serve to contextualize some beautifully conceived programmed music within an edgier club culture. [Jul 2012, p.62]
  11. Jul 25, 2012
    90
    What Shackleton has done with this mammoth album is create a full-bodied, visceral experience that meditates on the nature of the essence of a sound in a time and the space of time in which it appears, and the narration only presents the voice as the confrontation with time.

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