New Magnetic Wonder

Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 23
  2. Negative: 0 out of 23
  1. Paste Magazine
    60
    Infuriatingly inconsistent. [Dec 2006, p.90]
  2. Q Magazine
    60
    As ever... not everything comes off. But the good bits are very good indeed. [Apr 2007, p.116]
  3. On this album, Schneider seems a bit torn between his task as a hook-writing pop musician and a seeming urge to rock a bit harder, with the added burden of being unable to put his toys down when he should.
User Score
8.1

Universal acclaim- based on 24 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. MikefromMaine
    May 11, 2007
    9
    It reminds me of the Beatles (maybe just John), working their way out of the 60s, and thru the 70s/80s/90s, writing pop songs inspired by It reminds me of the Beatles (maybe just John), working their way out of the 60s, and thru the 70s/80s/90s, writing pop songs inspired by bands of those times along the way. Some really nicely referenced classics on this on here, personally, I like the Sunndal song showing its Fastbacks influence veyr nicely. All in all, the most fun album of the year so far. Full Review »
  2. CaseyD
    Mar 28, 2007
    10
    So far the best album of the year. I think this is the album they wanted to make as a farefell to fans. Not that Velocity of Sound was a So far the best album of the year. I think this is the album they wanted to make as a farefell to fans. Not that Velocity of Sound was a throwaway. It felt more like an EP and this is their shining moment. Full Review »
  3. ThomasB
    Mar 20, 2007
    8
    This album marks Robert Schneider's return to his baroque and orchestral pop roots after the intentionally lo-fi charms of "Velocity of This album marks Robert Schneider's return to his baroque and orchestral pop roots after the intentionally lo-fi charms of "Velocity of Sound." While NMW press hype has concentrated on his math nerdery and invention of a new musical scale, the compositions and interstitial music showcasing it are rudimentary at best, though not unpleasant. Meanwhile, the songs in the normal 12 tones of the Pythagorean scale show Schneider's masterful hand at nodding to his influences (ELO, in this case) while producing catchy, upbeat pop that is uniquely his own and instantly identifiable. The lesson here: mathematical excursions into new sounds are all well and good, but if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Full Review »