Pictures - The Len Price 3
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72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 7 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: This is the third album for the British rock band that has been compared to The Who for its 1960's sound.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. 80
    Guitarist Glenn Page appears to be channelling namesake Jimmy in his Yardbirds days, while the spot-on harmonies of "After You're Gone" suggest a live anthem in waiting. [Mar 2010, p.93]
  2. Pictures is one of the rare albums that manages to hold tight to what is good about a band (in this case, energy and hooky songs), and add on new things (wider instrumentation, better arrangements) without compromising their strengths.
  3. Sonically, the LP3 aren’t doing anything their forebears didn’t already perfect by 1967--or really, anything they didn’t already do on their first two fully-formed records, outside of a few snatches of horn and organ. But the Len Price 3 are doing their best to honor this rich musical heritage.
  4. The whiplash reverberations of the 1964 Kinks and '65 Who on the LP3's third album, Pictures--the metallic thwack and buzzing sustain of singer-guitarist Glenn Page's Rickenbacker; the fast martial step and chrome-glaze harmonies in "I Don't Believe You" and "Nothing Like You"--are authentically vicious.
  5. The Len Price 3 sound well aware that people aren’t tuning in for their Swiftian commentary, but for the fizzy fury of their cheerfully unreconstructed rock’n’roll. Pictures may well be what the doctor ordered, for those whose preferred consultant’s last name is Feelgood.
  6. They do what they do with admirable panache, ripping thorugh 13 buzzy little items in a shade over half an hour as though lives, or at least wallets, depended on it. [Mar 2010, p.105]
  7. 60
    The trio are at their most effective when meshing from-the-streets comment with clanging guitars and harmonies in the vein of early-period Who, see the wry poke at tabloid celebrity, "Keep Your Eyes On Me." It's only when they descend into the Kinks pastiche of "Mr. Grey" that the bar is lowered. [Mar 2010, p.96]
Score distribution:
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