Pure Heroine

User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 554 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 554
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  1. Jul 21, 2015
    4
    Dragged out, repetitive, self important, and void for the most part of any musical finesse. It does however have one or two catchy tunes, but it doesn't make the whole album worth purchasing.
  2. Feb 9, 2015
    4
    Lorde's music is really boring. I heard Royals at the cottage on the radio and it felt like forever. Royals was the most boring song I ever heard! Lorde has bad music and avoid it unless you want to fall asleep. Still not as bad as Justin Bieber, Mariah Carey, or Rebecca Black though.
  3. Nov 15, 2013
    5
    If ever there was an artist who popped up out of nowhere, yet had amazing success, it's Lorde. Just before she released Royals, I heard that this new girl was about to release this new song that was going to be big. I quickly dismissed it, but how wrong I was to do that. Royals is currently in its seventh consecutive week on the US Billboard Hot 100 and has also proved a decent hitIf ever there was an artist who popped up out of nowhere, yet had amazing success, it's Lorde. Just before she released Royals, I heard that this new girl was about to release this new song that was going to be big. I quickly dismissed it, but how wrong I was to do that. Royals is currently in its seventh consecutive week on the US Billboard Hot 100 and has also proved a decent hit worldwide. And all the while, I was wondering what on earth people were seeing in it. It's beat is very boring and doesn't change much and Lorde really can't sing well. Above all, a take down of consumerist pop culture is nothing new. In fact, it's rather outdated. If Royals had been released at the height of urban music's biggest success between 2001-2008, when songs that involved gold teeth and gold chains really were all over the radio, the song would have been a timely commentary. But music right now is very different. Relatability has been the name of the game in the last few years. That is why break up ballads and self-empowerment anthems have been some of the biggest hits in recent times. After the urban craze died out and the dance music craze started waning, the music industry realised that a song that the public relate to equals mega bucks. So, I don't know what Lorde is going on about by saying that all the songs on the radio right now are out of touch with the public. Of course, she has just turned 17 and is likely researching the industry and getting out her frustrations, but that is the problem. Someone as young as she is won't realise that what she's doing has been done before nor will she realise that she doesn't bring anything new to the table. But like most of us when we were 17, she wants to go against the system and that's pretty much the concept of the whole album.
    All the songs talk about society's obsession with wealth, status, fame, even violence, and how Lorde wants to stay away from all that, which is certainly admirable. Songs like Tennis Court, 400 Lux, Team and Glory And Gore certainly talk about this theme well. Then there's the gem of the album, the breath-taking Buzzcut Season, which is about how Lorde and her best friend put themselves in their own little bubble away from the circus of the world. It's child-like and innocent in the most beautiful way. It's atmospheric, hypnotic, dreamy, and if the whole album sounded like this it would be a masterpiece. But the other five tracks are very mediocre and show that Lorde has a long way to go. I quite like albums that deal with the theme of being against consumerism and are heavy with satire, but Lorde really goes off the deep end when she sings Ribs, a song about how she's struggling with the idea of growing up and how she feels so old (accompanied with a never-ending seasick loop of a beat that makes me want to throw up). Speaking as someone who is nearly 24, to hear someone who has just turned 17 talk about feeling old is quite laughable to me. I look back on my younger years and realise that I fussed a lot over nothing and that feeling that I was old was ridiculous. So, I'm well past the age of taking this stuff from a 17 year old seriously. This is why I don't understand why people in their 20's and older are loving this album as it hardly deals with their age group. Lorde has also spouted feminist views recently that are somewhat controversial and really show her age. It's fine if she wants to refrain from singing songs about love and sex, but she has so much more time to go down the route later, as lots of female artists do. If she keeps away from those subjects her entire career, then we can talk. But she's only 17. Give it time.
    Don't get me wrong, Lorde has potential, but she has a long way to go. She doesn't have a great voice and I see no evidence of her playing an instrument, so all she has to stand on is her songwriting and it's far from perfect. I am really surprised at the amount of critics giving this album amazing reviews, reviews that would be more fitting of a much older artist's magnum opus rather than what it really is a teenager's naive debut that requires lots of work.
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  4. Oct 4, 2013
    5
    The sound is good, the music and the voice too. But Pure Heroine I love the title) has only a few songs that are quite interesting. In the songs the lyrics are poor and that's something that disappointed me a lot. However, I want to support Lorde as she is a young artist which has a bright future and I hope she doesn't turn up like Miley Cyrus.
  5. KFZ
    Oct 3, 2013
    6
    After listening to The Love Club EP i was expecting something awesome from Pure Heroine, what I got was a watered down Lorde ready for a broader audience, lacking the emotion that caught my attention at first. Its not a bad album, but sits besides a Lana Del Rey or Rihanna album, nothing more than a major label trying to maximize the profit from the hype around Lorde.
  6. Nov 16, 2013
    6
    Lorde could have a bright future as a singer/songwriter ahead of her. While listening to her album, I understood that she had direction which is unusual for someone to have so young to have, as there are other female artists who release albums that aren't cohesive. And that's what Pure Heroine is cohesive. However, after the first three tracks, everything else weren't as strong. TheLorde could have a bright future as a singer/songwriter ahead of her. While listening to her album, I understood that she had direction which is unusual for someone to have so young to have, as there are other female artists who release albums that aren't cohesive. And that's what Pure Heroine is cohesive. However, after the first three tracks, everything else weren't as strong. The lyrics were mediocre and the production was just uninteresting; it felt all too rushed. My harshness is due to the awesomeness of "Tennis Court" and "Royals" the production and lyrics are so amazing that everything else seems lackluster. There are moments that Lorde shone as a songwriter, especially with "I'll see the veins of my city as they do in space". She's so young and could have an amazing career, I do doubt that her mainstream success will last.... Unless she pulls a Miley. Expand
  7. Nov 25, 2013
    6
    Lorde is just an amazing Singer to have just 17 years old. Her style and music is so good, fresh, I love it. This album takes you to amazing sounds. 'Tennis Court' and 'Team' are one of the the best tracks, take you to new places and rythms.
  8. Oct 22, 2013
    6
    Lorde has promise, guaranteed. Her songwriting is strong but it does tread the line between morally and culturally condemning the status quo, paranoia, fear and sarcasm. With so many analogies and messages brought up, it's hard, with her superb, cryptic songwriting, to differentiate all the meanings from one another. At some points it feels as if she goes back on her word but the themes doLorde has promise, guaranteed. Her songwriting is strong but it does tread the line between morally and culturally condemning the status quo, paranoia, fear and sarcasm. With so many analogies and messages brought up, it's hard, with her superb, cryptic songwriting, to differentiate all the meanings from one another. At some points it feels as if she goes back on her word but the themes do converge around the central concept of adolescence. Musically, the minimalism frequently stays dry and for a pop album, it isn't at all catchy. Even her attempts to make it catchy like the obnoxious "yeahs" in "Tennis Court" do more benefit for the skip button than for her career. Like lukewarm water, easy to swallow but nothing to enjoy, there isn't much to grasp, engage or intrigue. There's more instruments and effects in her style of music that can be incorporated that can be more engaging (delay, electric guitar, distortion, better synths). Her emotive lyricism doesn't really balance with the empty musical personality. The whole album is a bit of a lackluster experience honestly, but it's led with her level of ambition and with gutsy stabs at society she leads by standing apart from most pop artists. But she doesn't really reach that level of passion that can qualify as heroic; here she's shown what she can do but she herself hasn't followed through, so much for conquering. With her vague and characterless minimalistic instrumentation and cryptic lyricism, her command isn't all that strong or commanding, but her promise is there, just hidden.

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  9. Nov 27, 2013
    5
    With regret, after so many listens to try to like the courageous effort by Lorde, for a new sound, I have to say, that for me, it was not moving, from any point of view I so wanted to like it, but I'm so sorry to say, I did not.
  10. Mar 1, 2014
    5
    We've definitely found the next big thing in sixteen year-old Lorde, but despite her penchant for song writing and her instantly recognizable voice that portrays the popular teen angst craze that's went around since Nirvana, it'd be hard to differentiate the songs if I were asked, for they all sound ridiculously alike; depressing, well-written and elegantly-performed by the immenselyWe've definitely found the next big thing in sixteen year-old Lorde, but despite her penchant for song writing and her instantly recognizable voice that portrays the popular teen angst craze that's went around since Nirvana, it'd be hard to differentiate the songs if I were asked, for they all sound ridiculously alike; depressing, well-written and elegantly-performed by the immensely talented Ella Yelich O' Connor. Expand
  11. Sep 7, 2015
    4
    This album is pure heroine but a little bit boring too. I think that after hearing 4 or 5 songs of the album I'll feel exhausted and bored.I like Royals and Tenis Court but i think that this album is overrated.
Metascore
79

Generally favorable reviews - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 28
  2. Negative: 0 out of 28
  1. Feb 4, 2014
    90
    It’s the music here, not the sharp-toothed lyricism, which sets the record so far apart from the rest of the field.
  2. Q Magazine
    Nov 22, 2013
    80
    It isn't perfect but it adds up to an intimidatingly assured opening shot from a major new talent. [Dec 2013, p.108]
  3. Nov 1, 2013
    70
    Whilst Lorde’s world creates its own incredibly distinctive atmosphere, it feels accessible and open to maturing.