• Record Label: Hyperdub
  • Release Date: May 29, 2012
Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Jul 5, 2012
    60
    If albums could have Nutrition Facts, Quarantine would lack the vitamins and minerals we normally associate with Laurel Halo's production, but it's hard to dislike the album entirely because, after all, she's still quite skillful at making her Metal Gear Solid-esque ambiences seize and enrapture us with their swirling, bubbling drones.
  2. 60
    Quarantine is less concerned with the tropes of olde world dance music, more fixated on gloopy post-club ambience.
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 15 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Dec 27, 2013
    9
    There isn't anything out there that sounds like Quarantine, not even Laurel Halo's previous work. Unlike other human/machine hybrids the soundThere isn't anything out there that sounds like Quarantine, not even Laurel Halo's previous work. Unlike other human/machine hybrids the sound produced here isn't some cyborg with fully integrated elements smoothly conjoined, but a frisson between Laurel Halo's fallible almost awkward vocals and the Sci-fi sounds her battery of audio equipment produces. It's this awkwardness which makes the album so good but difficult too, which may mean it'll alienate as many people as it entrances, which would be a shame 'cos there is a lot to enjoy here. Take a chance and get infected. Full Review »
  2. Jul 7, 2013
    9
    Easily one of the queasiest albums in recent memory, Halo's attempt to unify her sound and provide an entry work into her past works courtesyEasily one of the queasiest albums in recent memory, Halo's attempt to unify her sound and provide an entry work into her past works courtesy of Hyperdub, coming off a sterling year this can be equal parts off-putting and utterly enthralling. The main element here is Halo's voice, which she wields like The Knife and manipulates to no end; a child-like coo here, abrasive atonalities there, a warm wash when the moment calls for it. For an electronic album, there is little in the way of a beat, and the grappling with ideas can be frustrating, but hard work will win the day, and this album's secrets will be solved one day. Full Review »