Say It - Born Ruffians
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 1 out of 12
  1. By focusing inwards, Born Ruffians have done that whole 'maturing' thing that us reviewers like to talk about, and created a much improved piece of art.
  2. As confidently current as Say It comes off, it doesn’t sound susceptible to fashion. Given enough attentive ears, the Ruffians may have made a statement that will last a long time--or at least assembled enough ears for the next one.
  3. ‘Say It’ recalls the airy refreshment of Vampire Weekend’s ‘Contra’ and the garage-pop fun of Jonathan Richman’s ‘Rock’N’Roll With The Modern Lovers’.
  4. At times, it seems like Born Ruffians elude pure pop magic--sometimes by choice, sometimes by chance--but they way they bounce off of each other and lock together again is never less than impressive, and one of the greatest joys Say It offers.
  5. Curiously akin to Violent Femmes, the trio are precussively sparse, defiantly devoid of distortion and occasionally potty-mouthed. [Jul 2010, p.122]
  6. Some bands deliver a masterpiece straight out of the gate. Not Born Ruffians. But with Say It, they’re getting warmer.
  7. Their tics are still here--just listen to how they build the payoff of “Nova Leigh” from a variety of angles--they just aren’t the exciting focal point anymore. That’s probably better in the long run for the band, who have all quit school to rep Born Ruffians full-time, but doesn’t lead Say It to the mountaintop it could have shared with Red, Yellow and Blue.
  8. While the inclusion of faint funk ("Sole Brother") and hints of country twang ("Retard Canard") expands Born Ruffians' repertoire, the track "Blood, the Sun & Water" brings the most energy to the set.
  9. 60
    The finished result has a curiously restrained feel, an odd mix of clumpy drumming, bluesy vocals and spidery guitars. [Jul 2010, p.103]
  10. The spare production on their second album is less indebted to the post-punk era. [July 2010, p. 129]
  11. Born Ruffians’ sophomore album is a cohesive, occasionally repetitious helping of choppy indie pop, almost brutalist in its minimalist instrumentation and dry-as-a-bone production.
  12. Much of the material sounds rushed and half-finished, like a high schooler trying to write a research page paper during his lunch period.
User Score
6.9

Generally favorable reviews- based on 8 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Dec 5, 2010
    8
    Critically underrated. One of those great, joyful, sparse, delightfully messy indie rock albums. They remind me of Harlem Shakes, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, and Wave Machines. Try this album and enjoy. Full Review »