Metascore
90

Universal acclaim - based on 33 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 33 out of 33
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 33
  3. Negative: 0 out of 33
Buy On
  1. It's one of the loosest, most varied, and entertaining albums of its time.
  2. The cameos (T.I., Janelle MonĂ¡e, Gucci Mane) hit all the right spots, the skits are delightfully juvenile, and Big Boi's idiosyncratic delivery and tightrope cadences throughout teeter toward Jedi mind tricks. Stank you very much.
  3. That OutKast comeback will surely be killer, but for now respect is due the way of this splendid solo adventure.
  4. Big Boi delivers an inventive, high-spirited set full of synth-funk signifiers, talk-box flair and snares.
  5. The album bubbles over with insidious grooves, inventive samples, and lissome rhyming about things frivolous and fraught.
  6. It's full of surface charm, the type of music that is designed to sound big in a club, the soundtrack for a night of excess. But there's very little conventional about these beats and the way Big Boi nimbly spreads his living-large imagery over them.
  7. Backstreet spawn aside, it may finally be settling in that Sir Lucious Left Foot does gather itself around Big Boi enough to make it the best OutKast-related release since the duo dropped Aquemini a dozen years ago (we can debate its merits next to the incredible six tracks or so on the bloated Stankonia, sure). For a Kast fan, this is life-affirming.
  8. It's eclectic, electrifying, eccentric and more than a little bit ludicrous, but Sir Lucious's ambition is as infectious as its madness is dazzling.
  9. It's a record which brilliantly lives up to and even exceeds all the hype, mystique and hyperbole that has surrounding it since it's inception, and it's essential for anyone with even a fleeting interest in rap music.
  10. Big Boi isn't an MC; he's a songwriter. That distinction is what separates him from other rappers, and it's what makes Sir Lucious--an album whose elan is instantaneously felt and whose spirit only becomes more invigorated with each listening--such a pleasure.
  11. The fact that this album feels so complete even without any words from his old partner reinforces just what peak form Big Boi is in.
  12. A succession of enjoyable songs with plenty to offer.
  13. Tasty cuts abound here, but Sir Lucious is most enjoyable as a complete listening experience.
  14. What's finally made it is an expansive, guest-packed 57 minutes that recall the Southern hip-hop bounce of 2003's 'Speakerboxxx', but with an added twist of maturity.
  15. As the name may suggest, it's a daring, sprawling effort that simultaneously ventures beyond hip-hop and celebrates the genre's very history.
  16. Big Boi's lyrically on point, too, balancing cavalier wit and grown-man profundity that puts this album among Outkast's best. Your move, 3000.
  17. It's no mean feat for him to drop a solo album that's both a trove of pop jams and a profound piece of artistic experimentation, and he's done just that--a remarkable achievement by any measurement.
  18. On Sir Lucious Left Foot, Big Boi does something even more difficult: He gives us a great album that sounds nothing like any of the great albums he's already given us. From where I'm sitting, that's an even greater achievement.
  19. Throughout its 12 quality tracks, it's interesting enough to engage listeners and engaging enough to keep the listeners interested. It's a step well above most of the hip-hop that has been released in recent years and will be played frequently until a new OutKast album materializes.
  20. Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty isn't just an expertly produced and performed slab of brilliantly odd, futuristic dance music. It isn't just the best rap album of the year so far.
  21. Big Boi has exquisite taste in music, guests, lyrics and choruses--not to mention the knowledge and expertise of how to put a classic album together. And whoever bet against him just lost. Big time.
  22. He's less pimp than craftsman, packing more style--and more substance--into his four-minute-long songs than other rappers deliver in an entire album.
  23. Freed from the aesthetic demands of an odd-couple partnership, Big Boi (Antwan Patton) improves on the standard set with 2003's Speakerboxxx, an ostensibly solo work crystallized inside a double-album set, delivering a record that's rigidly focused and almost uniformly strong.
  24. 90
    Aided by producers Organized Noize and Mr. DJ, Sir Lucious Left Foot is a monster of an album.
  25. Freed from the aesthetic demands of an odd-couple partnership, Big Boi (Antwan Patton) improves on the standard set with 2003's Speakerboxxx, an ostensibly solo work crystallized inside a double-album set, delivering a record that's rigidly focused and almost uniformly strong.
  26. Though his partner is absent, this sounds and feels like another OutKast experience--a welcome one.
  27. Here, he recruits a cast of producers ranging from the familiar (Dungeon Family compatriots Mr. DJ and Organized Noize) to the surprisingly appropriate (Scott Storch, Lil Jon) to craft a palette of dexterous futurist funk that seems to be a logical successor to the groundwork laid by 2003's Speakerboxxx.
  28. You're left with an album from which ideas continually gush forth in a torrent.
  29. The Wire
    80
    The album is the product of a consistent vision, synthesizing hip-hop's beat architecture and sound manipulation with bespoke funk playing. [Sep 2010, p.50]
  30. Sir Lucious is all but hiccup-free, exceptionally consistent in its mad musical mission. Each track on the record is an explosive standalone statement within a greater unifying framework; it's an album, but these songs are pipe bombs.
  31. Uncut
    80
    Big Boi's absurd--and absurdly dextrous--verbiage knits it all together handsomely. [Sep 2010, p.85]
  32. 80
    He possesses flawless rap skills, artiness, tasty hooks and smart production. There are lots of strong tracks, but his debut is highly enjoyable as a complete listening experience.
  33. The resulting, mercifully final product is, as you might have suspected all along, fantastic, by turns triumphant, defiant, and gleefully crass.
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 156 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 28
  2. Negative: 2 out of 28
  1. Aug 20, 2010
    10
    A very original album which incorporates several genres to make one unique and memorable track after the next. Considering Big Boi's trackA very original album which incorporates several genres to make one unique and memorable track after the next. Considering Big Boi's track record, this should come as no surprise. I've listened to this album about two dozen times and I'm still enjoying it as much as I did on my initial listen. Great stuff! 10/10 Full Review »
  2. Sep 11, 2010
    10
    Cool, inventive, eccentric and powerful, this is the hip-hop album of the year or maybe it might be the album of the year. It retainsCool, inventive, eccentric and powerful, this is the hip-hop album of the year or maybe it might be the album of the year. It retains Outkast's eccentricity and genre clashing tendencies but it completely launches Big Boi out of the Outkast area by being a completely fresh listen with creatively layered sounds and Big Boi's smart lyricism with an offbeat rhyming style and delivery. Full Review »
  3. Aug 13, 2010
    10
    One of the best rap albums in a VERY long time.

    In an industry that focuses on simple, poppish garbage that emphasizes catchiness over
    One of the best rap albums in a VERY long time.

    In an industry that focuses on simple, poppish garbage that emphasizes catchiness over quality, it is refreshing to hear half of the 'Kast deliver a stunning and fully accomplished solo album. Big Boi has delivered a monster that consists of irregular beats ranging from electro to classical that are laced with rapid fire rhymes from himself and worthy verses from guest spots.

    Although Andre 3000 is notably absent save for a track he produced, the album actually takes a much stronger stand. Big Boi has more room to express himself as an equally awesome musician. Taking it that way, Jive sort of gave a gift to Big Boi. Big OBi had been overshadowed long enough and finally gets his time to shine.

    Lyrically, Big Boi has improved miles-ahead of his previous material. He now pulls better punchlines and similes and metaphors than the simple gangsta-like rap he used to do. Even the people he chooses who from the outlook don't work well have each etched a significant place in the album. Gucci Mane usually is horrible, but he is the perfect fit on Shine Blockas. Jamie Foxx gives a soulful chorus full of pain and angst on a production by Lil Jon. Yes, the king of crunk.

    My only complaint (and this is a minor one) is that Big Boi's lyrical topics aren't varied and are solely braggadocio. Speakerboxxx featured some feel-good lyrics and some political rants. But nonetheless, Sir Lucious is a brilliant piece of work that is uncompromising and that chooses quality as the first priority.
    Full Review »