• Record Label: Columbia
  • Release Date: Nov 14, 2000
User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 8 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 8
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 8
  3. Negative: 1 out of 8

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  1. MarwanJ
    Aug 14, 2004
    10
    Excellent- She Bangs the 1st single was heart thrombing, ass shaking awesome song, and other songs like Jezabel and St Tropez remind me of the good times. I love you Ricky Martin!
  2. akshayw
    May 1, 2005
    10
    sound loaded is a fantastic album.the singles like she bangs, loaded, jezabel &one night man can capture anyones heart.he has proved to be a matured singer and i would like to wish him all my best wishes for his coming albums.he is just amazing!
  3. HollyM.
    Jul 16, 2001
    10
    I love this cd but it just one his bast I got this cd the day it came out becase I got all his cd's and I knew it was wonderful becase I love ricky's muisc and hay if you ask me I say bay this cd and promise you will be a ricky martin fan for live!
  4. AngelinaR.
    Sep 12, 2002
    10
    It's simply amazing! I listen it diary from two years now and I can tell that I love it!
  5. JennyT
    Mar 24, 2007
    10
    It is a wonderful album, my favourite song is "Cambia la piel", ricky is perfect und all fans love him.
Metascore
64

Generally favorable reviews - based on 6 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Less than two years after the crossover phenomenon erupted in earnest, this kitchen sink approach to Latin American pop already sounds incredibly formulaic -- albeit a formula that still has some life in it.
  2. The relentlessly likable and danceable Sound Loaded plunges listeners once again into Ricky's hothouse world, with its lush evocations of exotic climes ("St. Tropez"), Spanglish salsa-club blowouts (the irresistible "Amor") and voodoo hussies (oh, pick one -- "Jezebel"). The singing sounds a little tired, but the monstrously effective production is firmly in place, with arena-size swells swamping the ballads ("Come to Me" eventually drowns) and Latinate curlicues (like the arabesque-ing guitar that redeems "Nobody Wants to Be Lonely") peeping from the corners.
  3. Fizzy but numbingly predictable.... The delightful element of surprise occasioned by Martin's breakthrough English-language debut has been replaced by a formula-milking attempt to replicate its track record. This is particularly disappointing, since in concert Martin stirs things up by doing more than nodding to his roots.