User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 33 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 33
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 33
  3. Negative: 1 out of 33

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  1. Apr 19, 2011
    9
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. A beautifully textured, airy, and oddly amusing sonic adventure, that keeps a nice mellow intensity and yet explores new territory on every track. It's a grower, unless you can distinguish just how wonderful some of the field recordings, vocal manipulations, and the subtle instrumentation are. At 21 years old, Jaar cements himself a truly fantastic debut. Expand
  2. Sep 1, 2012
    9
    This album is less a collection of songs and more an experience, and a truly magnificent experience at that. It is like nothing you've ever heard and a must listen for everyone.
  3. Oct 4, 2013
    9
    The concept is great, this artistic minimalist album is one of the best of 2011, (a great year for music), Nico give us unique sounds that canĀ“t be even compared with others, is dense, weird but in a excellent way, He is a unique visionary, this album is the prove.
Metascore
86

Universal acclaim - based on 15 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 15
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 15
  3. Negative: 0 out of 15
  1. Dec 5, 2011
    80
    Jaar assembled the disc from several years' worth of recordings -- he's relentlessly productive -- but it has a conceptual unity that makes it feel like the product of a single burst of inspiration.
  2. May 18, 2011
    80
    Jaar attempted something ambitious with this album--it stands apart, even if it never risks a whole lot. Space Is Only Noise is unique, but also a work of modesty and, for an album that samples French poetry and is rarely danceable, it's unpretentious.
  3. May 13, 2011
    80
    Jaar, the son of conceptual artist Alfredo Jaar, can weave a heady spell, presenting himself somewhere between David Byrne and Ricardo Villalobos. [Jun 2011, p.85]