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Storytelling OST Image
Metascore
59

Mixed or average reviews - based on 12 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.6

Universal acclaim- based on 7 Ratings

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  • Summary: The Glasgow band's fifth album serves as the soundtrack to the Todd Solondz film of the same name--in theory, that is, as only a few minutes of this new material is actually used in the movie (in fact, much of the album was recorded after the movie was released). However, as with a typicalThe Glasgow band's fifth album serves as the soundtrack to the Todd Solondz film of the same name--in theory, that is, as only a few minutes of this new material is actually used in the movie (in fact, much of the album was recorded after the movie was released). However, as with a typical soundtrack album, expect snatches of dialogue and numerous instrumental tracks interspersed with fully-developed songs. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 12
  2. Negative: 2 out of 12
  1. 'Storytelling' contains some of B&S's finest songs since their 'If You're Feeling Sinister' peak.
  2. 'Storytelling' is the first indication that Stuart Murdoch has finally got some decent red meat down his gob and he's no longer resigned to wallowing in his dank indie mire until The Pastels come home.
  3. The vocal tracks have the unforced charm of the singles that Belle And Sebastian regularly turns out between albums: sunny pop with rainy lyrics.
  4. It's a disjointed affair, but there's no denying the robust confidence with which they carry it off. [June 2002, p.111]
  5. An occasionally jumbled, yet undeniably pleasant, collection that unsurprisingly feels like a hybrid of a proper Belle & Sebastian album and a more traditional film score.
  6. As uneven as the film itself.
  7. Hidden amongst the bilge, there are six proper songs here, with words and everything. But they only serve to prove how erratic Belle And Sebastian have become.

See all 12 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. JoeR
    Aug 24, 2005
    10
    The critics don't know jack.
  2. SabalomG.
    Jul 2, 2002
    7
    Not bad. Not bad at all. It is an OST, you know, you have to expect it to, you know, BE AN OST. Maybe they should just collectively bleed Not bad. Not bad at all. It is an OST, you know, you have to expect it to, you know, BE AN OST. Maybe they should just collectively bleed into a pint glass and deliver it to you on rollerskates without spilling a drop, then would you be satisfied? Expand
  3. OutAndAboutWithGilbertMulroneycakes
    Dec 6, 2003
    7
    Anyone noticed how Playlouder aren't much on constructive criticism? Anyway, what with seeing the film the other day and all, I decided, Anyone noticed how Playlouder aren't much on constructive criticism? Anyway, what with seeing the film the other day and all, I decided, mad, impulsive guy that I am, to revisit the soundtrack album. Remembered as I took the CD out of its jewel case that Dear Catastrophe Waitress keeps getting listed as B&S' fifth album, skipping this one completely. That can't be good. And...well, it is probably their least satisfactory album as a piece of work...but considering the competition, that doesn't mean grapes. It's not bad, but it doesn't really hold together as an album - perhaps partly due to the decision to write two or three tunes for the movie and rearrange them according to the action, making for a great soundtrack to a motion picture, but a slightly repetetive album. Still, the songs themselves sit nicely alongside the rest of their oevre - the title track, which has a hint of "Boy With The Arab Strap" melodicism to it, and "Big John Shaft" especially - and, you know, it's good and that. Reccomended if you're a B&S fan, but if not, get Tigermilk instead. For it is the alpha and the omega. Expand