• Record Label: Sub Pop
  • Release Date: Jan 26, 2010
User Score
7.7

Generally favorable reviews- based on 267 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 267

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  1. PaulA.
    Jan 29, 2010
    5
    Tedious, slow and plodding, this album doesn't live up to expectations.
  2. Jan 28, 2013
    5
    Beach House still aren't mainstream-suitable but they partly improved what bugged me in their previous records. One being the tedious and in parts boring tone of their music and the other being unrecognisable hooks. Teen Dream is better in that, but is still a very strange release that doesn't fit my type of music. Nevertheless, I honour their talent in composing the lyrics.
  3. FrankG
    Jan 27, 2010
    6
    It sounds like Beach House, but also more modern (like they
  4. SamK.
    Jan 29, 2010
    6
    I'm a huge Beach House fan, but by leaning more towards the conventional indie rock sound (that critics LOVE), Beach house looses much of the uniqueness and intimacy present on their first two albums. Too bad...but Victoria's voice is amazing, I must say!
Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 35 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 35
  2. Negative: 0 out of 35
  1. Teen Dream is kind of MOR, it would go down a treat at a dinner party, there are boring bits and the doleful DIY magic of the debut seems to have more or less run out. But it’s shot through with more than a handful of heartstoppingly wonderful moments.
  2. 80
    This Baltimore dream-pop duo, whose dense-fog organs, reverb-y slide guitars, and nodding harmonies feel as lush as a midnight walk in a wet garden. On their third album, those feelings now sound like actual songs, with swelling choruses and an all-encompassing ache.
  3. Teen Dream sheds the uncertainties evident in past Beach House albums--each melodic turn (and there are many) balances the force of confidence with the momentum of curiosity.