User Score
9.2

Universal acclaim- based on 100 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 100
  2. Negative: 0 out of 100

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  1. May 28, 2011
    10
    Staggering. A masterpiece of sound, ambition, ambiance, and songwriting, this album is something that no alt-rock collection is complete without.
  2. Mar 22, 2011
    9
    Took me awhile to fully appreciate this album but what an album it is. Sounds completely different from Modest Mouse today. The lyrics are dark and the tracks are teetering on the edge of Neo-psychedelic rock. The lyrics are very well written and it's just a really good album. All In All, you may not like it the first time but give it a second go and you'll definitely enjoy this album. A-
  3. Dec 22, 2010
    10
    Modest Mouse gained huge popularity in the late 2010's for their album good news for people who love bad news. But Brock's greatest work is no doubt The moon and Antarctica. A surreal musical adventure the strongest of all the albums and one of the few of their albums were i haven't found at least one average song (even good news had some annoying songs notably bury me with it).
  4. Aug 7, 2012
    10
    A great kaleidoscope of emotion and sound. Few albums are as hard hitting as "The Moon And Antarctica" Isaac Brock is nothing short of a genius, this album is a look into the head of the Modest Mouse Front-man. This album takes you on a journey through his mind, like a collage of memories, drunk ramblings, introspective thoughts, and beautiful soundscapes. "The Moon And Antarctica" is a classic and if at first you don't "get it" give it a couple more listens it's well worth it for this timeless slice of Americana. Expand
Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 22 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 22
  2. Negative: 1 out of 22
  1. A sort of concept album about cold and distant places--creepy sound effects and odd nods to science and space abound--these 15 songs rarely settle into one place for long, opening with the characteristically potent "3rd Planet" before veering off into weird cacophony, jarring interludes, mellow meanderings, and general tunelessness.
  2. The music on The Moon & Antarctica is as lonely and desolate as the title suggests...
  3. Clocking in at an hour, and incorporating much schizophrenic style-hopping, this is far from the concession to one-dimensional economy often required for a major-label debut. [#47, p.53]