The Pearl Sessions

The  Pearl Sessions Image
Metascore
84

Universal acclaim - based on 4 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.3

Generally favorable reviews- based on 6 Ratings

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  • Summary: The Pearl Sessions includes not only the original final studio album from the singer-songwriter but also outtakes, demos, and studio banter between Janis, the Full-Tilt Boogie Band and her producer, Paul A. Rothchild.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. May 15, 2012
    90
    The Pearl Sessions with newly found studio outtakes, live performances and chatter rarities, the tumult of its original 1971 (three months after her passing) comes through loud and clear.
  2. May 15, 2012
    90
    Hardcore Joplin fans and historians have an excellent retrospective package which, while illuminating the process of the creation of Pearl, doesn't replace it in the canon.
  3. May 15, 2012
    70
    The extra tracks are fun, but far from essential.
  4. 70
    Suffice it to say that unless you simply need to own everything Janis touched, this package is of negligible value. Newcomers will be better served by the 2005 edition with its powerful concert material showing how Joplin and the scrappy Full Tilt reinterpreted her earlier work.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Jun 27, 2017
    10
    earl opens with the boogie-based, up-tempo, Southern-tinged “Move Over” and set things off on a distinctive late-era psychedelic-rockearl opens with the boogie-based, up-tempo, Southern-tinged “Move Over” and set things off on a distinctive late-era psychedelic-rock path—although it still has oodles of soul. Joplin really lets loose here during the chorus, as piano and tambourine join the fold. Only Joss Stone might come close to giving the song justice, and maybe Melissa Etheridge wouldn’t be out of her league here either. The only problem is that she hits her stride only as the song hits the home-stretch. The swaying soul of “Cry Baby” has that voice reaching for the sky before going into the opening lines. From here she seizes control of the track as the guitar and piano subtly tag along for the buildup to the chorus. Sounding as if she’s possessed by Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin, the number is a perfect showcase for Joplin’s pipes—tender when needed, rougher when required. The soul side is exemplified on the lowdown, downbeat and almost jazz-ish “A Woman Left Lonely”. Joplin has the blues here, but also sounds like she’s channeling Procul Harem’s “Whiter Shade Of Pale” at the same time. Expand
  2. Nov 16, 2013
    10
    Pearl is proabl not her best album (I prefer hr earlier stuff) but the packaging is perfect! many alternate takes that are very interestingPearl is proabl not her best album (I prefer hr earlier stuff) but the packaging is perfect! many alternate takes that are very interesting especially the accoustic version of Me and Bobby McGee (enough to make me cry). Expand