The Rising - Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band
Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. 100
    A brave and beautiful album of humanity, hurt and hope from the songwriter best qualified to speak to and for his country.... A towering achievement. [Album of the Month, Sep 2002, p.102]
  2. Even for him, though, The Rising, with its bold thematic concentration and penetrating emotional focus, is a singular triumph.
  3. Springsteen's words may be weighted with the aftershocks of death, but the music, ironically, is animated; unlike ''Joad,'' ''The Rising'' is a pleasure to hear.
  4. Over the years, it might not stand up to classics such as Nebraska or The River, but the The Rising gives us something more important right now: a reason to believe.
  5. Impassioned and bold, this record is a triumph.
  6. 90
    Both sober and celebratory, The Rising makes a strong case for the transcending power of rock and roll.
  7. Any suggestion of a musical crisis of confidence, however, vanishes with the album's first chord, which picks up pretty much where Born In The U.S.A. left off 18 years ago.
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 91 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 42
  2. Negative: 0 out of 42
  1. ScottH
    Feb 13, 2006
    10
    Bruce does it again.
  2. RyanM.
    Apr 29, 2005
    10
    It seems uncanny how many great songs are on this record. One of the few albums where I never skip a track.
  3. Dec 17, 2013
    9
    While the title of the record isn't autobiograhpical for Springsteen, it might as well have been. I'm not sure if Bruce ever completely lostWhile the title of the record isn't autobiograhpical for Springsteen, it might as well have been. I'm not sure if Bruce ever completely lost his mojo (1995's The Ghost of Tom Joad is evidence enough) but many will agree that the once insuppressible Rock N Roller from New Jersey lost something other than his band during the mid 80's. The Renaissance of The Boss began with this reflective yet hopefull record. Over the decade or so since his come back with this album, his output has been incredibly consistent in terms of high quality as seems to continue to feed off the positivity present on this record. Springsteen hadn't sounded so appealling to the masses in almost 20 years before this and the majority of songs here woulnd't be out of place on any of his classic records between 1975 and 1984.

    The tunes have a big big sound, the lyrics are full of typical Springsteen slogan's of positivity and hope and while the cynic might call them cheesy at times, they couldn't be more suited for purpose. With plenty of epics and not a bad song to be found, "The Rising" is a must have record.
    Full Review »