• Record Label: MCA
  • Release Date: Oct 25, 2004
User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 12 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 12
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 12
  3. Negative: 1 out of 12

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  1. FuonqrrjetV
    Jan 7, 2005
    10
    The Disaster still hasn't come over continental europe ... ... that's the disaster actually
  2. Foxy
    Mar 1, 2005
    10
    What a great follow-up to Hörse Of The Dög. They couldn't have got it much better!
  3. KurdtS
    Nov 10, 2004
    10
    How can an album be so cool? Joy Division meets XTC meets Devo meets Ramones meets all those 80's one-hit-wonders in the House of Frankenstein. Decide for yourself.
  4. [Anonymous]
    Nov 15, 2004
    9
    This is a stunning album that may take a few listen throughs for some people. Yet the boys' brilliance shines through here and should be purchased by all people.
  5. rokker
    Jan 26, 2005
    10
    This is an incredible record - there's nothing like these guys around at the moment. I can hear bits of David Bowie, Black Sabbath, System Of A Down, The Cramps, The Doors, Dead Kennedies, Nick Cave, Iggy Pop and much more. People tell me the live shows are unbelieveable but I haven't seen them yet. Can't wait though!!
  6. Kesher
    May 29, 2005
    9
    Hahahaha and indeed ha! Riffs from Heaven...Basslines from Hell...Thumbs Up !!
  7. CalumG
    Dec 15, 2004
    10
    amazing, takes a few listens but its great.Every bit as good as his hair.
Metascore
84

Universal acclaim - based on 7 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 6 out of 7
  2. Negative: 0 out of 7
  1. A demented, disjointed, delicious-as-human-rump-steak modern classic. [23 Oct 2004, p.49]
  2. [Singer Guy] McKnight's baritone, which could earn him a packet doing horror movie voiceovers, injects melodrama into songs already drowning in it.
  3. Confrontational, clammy, brimming with confidence... ‘Royal Society’ is as majestic as its title implies.