User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 70 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 64 out of 70
  2. Negative: 4 out of 70
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  1. Nov 13, 2010
    5
    Even though this record is a production-value copy of Bring Me The Horizon's predecessor, "Suicide Season", it boasts two primary advantages in a quick comparison. The first thing I noticed upon my first listen of this record was the songwriting had vastly, vastly improved since "Suicide Season". This is an across-the-board improvement, from the riffs to the lyrics to the breakdowns. TheEven though this record is a production-value copy of Bring Me The Horizon's predecessor, "Suicide Season", it boasts two primary advantages in a quick comparison. The first thing I noticed upon my first listen of this record was the songwriting had vastly, vastly improved since "Suicide Season". This is an across-the-board improvement, from the riffs to the lyrics to the breakdowns. The second thing I noticed was the collaborations with other artists, coloring the music in a positive way that neither "Suicide Season" nor "Count Your Blessings" could. These things being said, the record was a disappointment, as far as vast improvements go. Especially since several of the breakdowns were direct rip-offs their last record. Really, fellows? Nothing new to give? I suppose if this record was meant to REPLACE "Suicide Season", it would be significantly more impressive. Expand
Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 9 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. Dec 21, 2010
    60
    On their third album, these dizzying British metalcore chemists swing erratically in an effort to shake genre conventions, flirting with dystopic Max Headroom stutter, electro gloom, and tender indie-folk cuddles.
  2. The sonic evolution of the group is remarkable, and the dark, introspective lyrics of Sykes will not only be cathartic for him, but for many.
  3. Revolver
    50
    By-the-numbers breakdowns, tired metalcore riffing, and cliched lyrics are still very much part of the group's formula. It's too bad since the band has plenty of energy and ambition. [Nov/Dec 2010, p.94]