Velocifero - Ladytron
User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 16 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 16
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 16
  3. Negative: 0 out of 16

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  1. Feb 3, 2014
    8
    With this fourth album, Ladytron does not surprise anymore, but, backed by and affirmed style in the course of the years, proposes today a astounding summary of this style. The fans from the outset will perhaps be disappointed, reproaching the group for repeating himself, others will certainly find their pleasure...if only they like Gothic and synthetic monotonous chants, with a strongWith this fourth album, Ladytron does not surprise anymore, but, backed by and affirmed style in the course of the years, proposes today a astounding summary of this style. The fans from the outset will perhaps be disappointed, reproaching the group for repeating himself, others will certainly find their pleasure...if only they like Gothic and synthetic monotonous chants, with a strong "eighties accent". The climate can be cold with a big sound and a martial rhythm, but the atmosphere is really captivating. Especially when Mira Aroyo sings in Bulgarian, like in the oppressing but hypnotic song "Black Cat". Ladytron preserves the troubling fragrance that makes his charm. Expand
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 26
  2. Negative: 1 out of 26
  1. The softness of Helen Marnie's voice against the rocky, stark landscape of Velocifero gives Ladytron its edge (something that doesn't work as well with the two tracks sung by Miro Aroyo in her Bulgarian tongue), but overall, it's never really enough.
  2. Even with a somewhat diminished speaker-filling capability and a couple of songs that seem to have less actual energy than they should, Velocifero's subtlety will eventually reward further listens.
  3. So, while highlights such as Ghosts' glam-rock gallop or Tomorrow's saturnine dream-pop make gripping use of frowny minor chords, slab-like synths and frostbitten vocals, the relentless severity becomes a tad oppressive.